Woodrow Wilson, Revolutionary Germany, and Peacemaking, 1918-1919: Missionary Diplomacy and the Realities of Power

By Klaus Schwabe; Rita Kimber et al. | Go to book overview

Notes

A Note on the Scholarly Apparatus

In view of the large amount of documentation cited in this study, the author and the translators have departed somewhat from customary procedures in order to make the notes as brief as possible.

The bibliography contains a complete bibliographical entry for every work cited in the notes. On the first occurrence of a title in the notes, the author's last name and either the full title or, with unusually long titles, a substantial portion of the title are cited. Thereafter, the author's last name alone serves as a short title for the work, provided only one work by this author is cited in the bibliography. For example, the first note citation for Harry Rudin, Armistice 1918 (New Haven, 1944), is "Rudin, Armistice 1918." Further references to this work appear simply as "Rudin" followed by the page number or numbers.

If an author is represented by two or more titles, the short citation will include a short title as well as the author's last name; for example, Arno Mayer's books Political Origins of the New Diplomacy and Politics and Diplomacy of Peacemaking: Containment and Counterrevolution at Versailles will be cited, respectively, as "Mayer, Political Origins" and "Mayer, Politics."

If two or more authors have the same last name, they will be distinguished by citing first names as well. For example, Harold J. Nelson and Keith L. Nelson are represented by only one work each. Thus, after the first citation, these works will be referred to simply as "Harold Nelson" and "Keith Nelson."

If authors with the same last name are represented by two or more titles, then the short citation will include the author's first name and last name and a short title:

Arthur S. Link, Wilson
Arthur S. Link, Woodrow Wilson: War, Revolution, and Peace
Werner Link, "Demokratische Staatsordnung"
Werner Link, Stabilisierungspolitik

The author and the translators felt that this system offered the dual advantage of avoiding unnecessary repetition while providing positive identification in every case.

Quotations from French and German have been left untranslated in the notes.

All the abbreviations in the notes are explained in the list of abbreviations. As a rule, the files of the German Foreign Office (Auswartiges Amt) are cited by volume number. Microfilm numbers and detailed archival call numbers are cited only if they are essential for the identification of a given document. The papers of Brockdorff-Rantzau are so poorly arranged and unsurveyable that film numbers proved necessary in every citation. For documents from the Diplomatic and Fiscal Branch of the National Archives, the decimal system used in those archives was adopted.

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