American Heroes, Myth and Reality

By Marshall W. Fishwick | Go to book overview

Soures

CHAPTER I
See Chapter II of W. G. Agard Classical Myths in Sculpture ( Madison, Wisconsin, 1951).
See D. Riddle The Martyrs, A Study in Social Control ( Chicago, 1931).
A full analysis appears in J. M. Mecklin The Passing of the Saint ( Chicago, 1941).
See Joseph Campbell, The Hero with a Thousand Faces ( New York, 1949); David Malcomson , Ten Heroes ( New York, 1939); and Otto Rank, The Myth of the Birth of the Hero ( New York, 1914).
See F. R. S. Raglan, The Hero: A Study in Tradition, Myth, and Drama ( London, 1936).
Arnold Toynbee, A Study of History ( London, 1934), III, p. 243.
See A. J. Guerard, Reflection on the Napoleonic Legend ( New York, 1924).
See John Galbraith "Perils of the Big Build-Up," New York Times, magazine section, March 7, 1954, p. 12 f.
See The Autobiography of Eva Peron: My Mission in Life ( New York, 1954)
These lines are quoted with the permission of Mr. Stevens and his publisher, Alfred Knopf.

CHAPTER 2
Lindbergh's subsequent reputation has fluctuated widely. Because of his work with the America First group that tried to keep the United States out of World War II, the Lone Eagle was discredited, and called a "Copperhead" by President Roosevelt. In 1953 his book, The Spirit of St. Louis, helped restore him; and in February, 1954, President Eisenhower made him a reserve Brigadier General.
See David Dewitt The Assassination of Abraham Lincoln and Its Expiation ( New York, 1909) and Lloyd Lewis' Myths Alter Lincoln ( New York, 1929).
See Robert A. Theobald The Final Secret of Pearl Harbor ( New York, 1954).
Donald Davidson, "A Note on American Heroes," in Brooks, Purser, and Warren An Approach to Literature ( New York, 1939), p. 137.
Peter Cartwright, Autobiography ( New York, 1856), p. 477.
David Riesman, The Lonely Crowd ( New Haven, 1950), Chapter 4.
See School and Society for July 22, 1950.

CHAPTER 3
See Jarvis M. Morse, "John Smith and his Critics: A Chapter in Colonial Historiography," in the Journal of Southern History, Vol. L, 1935. The main source for the life and exploits of Smith is to be found in his own works; his prose was almost as colorful as his actions. The first complete edition of his work was edited by Edward Arber and published in England in 1884; it was reprinted, with an additional introduction by A. G. Bradley, in 1910.
For a full discussion of the Smith-Pocahontas plays and novels, see Albert Keiser The Indian in American Literature ( New York, 1933).
Charles Poindexter, John Smith and His Critics ( Richmond, 1893), p. 61.
An idea of the tone of the volume may be had from this sentence: "Cheating, robbing, breaking promises--these three are clearly things which must cease to be

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