Community Practice: Theories and Skills for Social Workers

By David A. Hardcastle; Patricia R. Powers et al. | Go to book overview

12
Using Social Marketing
A full-page ad appeared in the New York Times (August 21, 2000, p. A11) displaying a young African American male's picture with a bold heading proclaiming, “Jared Has the Grades and the Determination. Now He Has the Tuition Too. ” Another full-page advertisement asked, “Why Do So Many People Celebrate the Birthday of a First-Century Rabbi?” (The New York Times, December 9, 1997) and proceeded to answer the question with Biblical references. A third featured a photograph of a woman literally being squeezed by a giant hand and a bold heading “Please Don't Squeeze the Actors!” (The New York Times, September 12, 2000, p. A25B).
A family services center, after a drop-off in clients, decides to keep its office open in the evenings to better serve potential clients who work during the day.
A private social work practitioner does pro bono work in an abuse shelter with physicians and other community professionals. In casual discussions with them, the social worker describes the scope and focus of her practice.
A social agency establishes an advisory group of clients to advise the agency on ways to improve service delivery.
A mental health agency manager regularly appears on radio talk shows as an expert on school violence and mental health approaches to school violence prevention.

The full-page advertisements were not promoting specific tangible products or immediate services. The advertisements were promoting social ideas to influence people's perceptions, values, and attitudes. Their intent was to alter people's social constructions and behaviors to become favorable to the ad's sponsors. These were examples of social marketing. The first advertisement explained how Jared's educational opportunities were enhanced by the Philip Morris Companies' contributions to the Thurgood Marshall Fund. (In fact, Philip Morris has been the largest contributor to the African American educational fund for the past 13 years. ) The ad is not promoting cigarettes or macaroni and cheese. The promotion is for the idea that the Philip Morris Companies are good community citizens (Drayfuss, 2000). It is encouraging an image as a precursor to promoting tangible products.

The second broadside also promoted an ideology more than a tangible product. It offered a free book asserting that as Jesus was a Jew and Jews can accept Jesus as the Messiah and still remain observant Jews. It wanted the ad's Jewish readers to eventually alter basic religious beliefs. Sponsorship was attributed to the ambiguously named Friends of the Chosen People Ministries.

The third advertisement, borrowing an image from a once-popular ad campaign for toilet tissue, contained the names of a long list in the words of the ad, of “well-known to the un

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Community Practice: Theories and Skills for Social Workers
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Preface v
  • Note viii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Contents *
  • Community Practice *
  • 1 - Community Practice: an Introduction 3
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • I - Understanding the Social Environment and Social Interaction *
  • 2 - Theory-Based, Model-Based Community Practice 33
  • Notes 57
  • References *
  • 3 - The Nature of Social and Community Problems 61
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • 4 - The Concept of Community in Social Work Practice 91
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • 5 - Community Intervention and Programs: Let's Extend the Clan 120
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • II - Community Practice Skills for Social Workers: Using the Social Environment *
  • 6 - Discovering and Documenting the Life of a Community 145
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • 7 - Using Assessment in Community Practice 172
  • Notes 202
  • References *
  • 8 - Using Self in Community Practice: Assertiveness 208
  • Notes *
  • References 240
  • 9 - Using Your Agency 244
  • Notes *
  • References 270
  • 10 - Using Work Groups: Committees, Teams, and Boards 272
  • Notes 292
  • References *
  • 11 - Using Networks and Networking 293
  • Note *
  • References *
  • 12 - Using Social Marketing 320
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • 13 - Using the Advocacy Spectrum 355
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • 14 - Using Organizing: Acting in Concert 391
  • Notes 420
  • References 421
  • 15 - Community Social Casework 426
  • Note 439
  • References *
  • Subject Index 441
  • Name Index 453
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