The Power of Black Music: Interpreting Its History from Africa to the United States

By Samuel A. Floyd Jr. | Go to book overview

Index
References to musical examples are given in boldface.
A. M. E. Church. See African Methodist Episco- pal Church
Abrams, Muhal Richard, 191
Adams, Leslie (composer), 239
Adzida, rhythms used in dance, 29, 30-31
Aesthetic communication, 229
African-American cultural studies, 276
African-American culture, 57, 91, 92, 94. See also Core culture; Cultural memory
African-American dance, 55, 66, 68. See also Dance, Drum, and Song; Master Juba; Ring dances
African-American folk music, 6, 48, 49, 51-53
African-American modernism, 268; begin- nings of, 87; and emergence of black mid- dle and elite classes, 89; expressed in Treemonisha, 90; and rejection of earlier val- ues, 88, 134, 145; social optimism of, re- flected in music, 105
African-American music, 151; Call-Response in, 150; continuity of, 267; difference from black music, 232n.6; early, characteristics of, 228; erotic elements in, 56; importance of performance in, 232, 269; influences on, 56; as microcosm of struggle-fulfillment, 227; and minimalism, 261; reflected in 1970s Chicago jazz, 194; relation of, to lis- teners, 97, 233; Signifyin(g) in, 95; success of composers of, 272; tendencies of, 262. See also African music; African songs; Black music; Call-and-response; Call-Response; Calls, Cries; Dance, Drum, and Song; Game songs; Gospel; Jazz; Prison work songs; Religious songs; Shouts; Sorrow songs; Spirituals
African-Catholic syncretism, 39
African culture, 15, 44. See also Core culture; Cultural memory
African dances: calinda, 52; as models for African-American dance, 55; as performed by slaves in New Orleans, 35-36; as ritual, 19; and spirit possession, 20; types of, 21. See also Possession dances
African God, 15; as symbol, 23
African gods, 15, 16. See also African religion; Esu; Orisha; Trickster tales
African metaphysics, 61
African Methodist Episcopal Church, 59
African music: described, 27-29; heteroge- nous sound ideal of, 27, 28, 46; innovation in, 34; as part of African universe, 33; per- formance style of, 32, 33: retained in New World, 38; used in 1960s jazz, 188; pur- pose of, 32; relation of, to speech, 32, 33; transformation of, into African-American music, 26; transported by slaves, 38
African myths, 22-23; as inspiration for mu- sic, 26; status of, during Harlem Renais- sance, 134; universal character of, 275. See also Myth and ritual; Myths
African Progress Union Committee, 101. See also Pan-Africanism
African religion, 14; as basis of African cul- ture, 22; elements of, 34, 97; intermediaries in, 19; life after death in, 18; as practiced by slaves, 39; and ritual, 22; unity of, 43. See also Esu; Orisha; Spirits
African rhythm, 28; in Adzida Dance, 30-31. See also Rhythm; Time line
African songs: commonalities of, 27; continu- ity of, with African-American songs, 51; eroticism in, 27; importance of, 32; relation-

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