Verbal Behavior and Learning: Problems and Processes: Proceedings

By Charles N. Cofer; Barbara S. Musgrave | Go to book overview

PREFACE

This book presents the Proceedings of the Second Conference on Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior, sponsored by the U.S. Office of Naval Research and New York University. The conference was held in June, 1961, at the Frank Jay Gould House, Ardsley-on-Hudson, New York. In the paragraphs which follow, I wish to report how this second conference was organized, how it proceeded in its discussions, what these proceedings represent, and to make grateful acknowledgement to those who made the conference possible.

In April, 1960, Denzel D. Smith, then of the U.S. Office of Naval Research, and Glenn L. Bryan, of that office, suggested to me that I set up a second conference along the lines of the first one which had been held in 1959. Both Dr. Smith and Dr. Bryan felt that the first conference had been valuable in providing for an interchange among students of verbal learning and verbal behavior and that a second meeting, following closely on the first, would capitalize on the gains made in the first conference. While new topics, it was recognized, should be used in the new conference, the participants should remain much the same. I agreed to organize a second conference and proceeded to write to the participants of the first one, asking about their willingness to participate again, soliciting topics to be discussed, and obtaining nominations of individuals (both past conferees and new people) for specific assignments. Of the 14 participants in the first conference, 11 agreed to participate again. W. A. Bousfield, C. E. Osgood, and D. D. Smith withdrew because of prior commitments and similar reasons.

A large number of topics and names were submitted by the group, but in two or three exchanges of correspondence agreement was reached on topics and participants. I then invited the new participants to join with us. Again, because of prior commitments, three people declined, but the final roster of nineteen participants was soon established and topics were assigned.

The conference procedure was the same as the one used before. Eight papers were prepared and distributed ahead of time. One conference session was devoted to each paper. The session for a paper was led by the discussant of the paper. Typically, he made some comments about

-vii-

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Verbal Behavior and Learning: Problems and Processes: Proceedings
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • Chapter 1 - Introduction and Summary 1
  • Chapter 2 - An Analysis of The Recognition Process 10
  • Comments on Professor Murdock's Paper 21
  • Chapter 3 - Stimulus Selection In Verbal Learning 33
  • References 48
  • References 48
  • References 67
  • Chapter 4 - Meaningfulness and Familiarity 76
  • Comments on Professor Noble's Paper 115
  • References 151
  • Chapter 5 - The Acquisition of Syntax 158
  • References 194
  • References 197
  • References 201
  • Chapter 6 - Mediated Associations: Paradigms and Situations 210
  • References 240
  • Comments on Professor Jenkins's Paper 242
  • References 245
  • References 252
  • Chapter 7 - Purpose and the Problem Of Associative Selectivity 258
  • References 289
  • Chapter 8 - One-Trial Learning 295
  • References 319
  • Comments on Professor Postman's Paper 320
  • References 328
  • Brief Notes on the Epam Theory Of Verbal Learning 332
  • References 333
  • Chapter 9 - Immediate Memory: Data and Theory 336
  • Comments on Professor Peterson's Paper 351
  • References 353
  • Chapter 10 - Summary and Evaluation 374
  • Index 383
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