Verbal Behavior and Learning: Problems and Processes: Proceedings

By Charles N. Cofer; Barbara S. Musgrave | Go to book overview
is to understand in detail what is behind the particular pattern of behavior observed for each individual subject in a verbal learning experiment, what other alternative do we have? I can think of none.I should like to conclude with this final comment: My insistence that a theoretical formulation be rendered in such a manner that it could be converted into a computer program does not in itself predispose us toward any particular type of theory. Any of the general-purpose digital computers now in use is (if supplied with enough magnetic tape) equivalent to a universal Turing machine and can, therefore, simulate any other machine--including man. The model resides wholly in the program supplied to the computer and not at all in the hardware of the computer itself. For this reason any model can be programmed-- provided only that it is sufficiently explicit. Now the models that are being developed by Newell, Simon, and Shaw and their students are not strictly S-R models. That is, although they are necessarily tested by comparing predictions with observed responses emitted in the presence of manipulable stimuli, the specific machinery that is assumed to intervene between the stimuli and the responses is not conveniently described by the traditional rules of S-R habit growth. If the S-R theorists are confident that they, too, can account for verbal behavior in this kind of detail, then I think these new methods pose for them a considerable challenge--to show that they can.
REFERENCES
Atkinson R. C. ( 1961) "The observing response in discrimination learning". J. Exp. Psychol., 62, 253-262.
Attneave F. ( 1957) "Transfer of experience with a class-schema to identification-learning of patterns and shapes". J. Exp. Psychol., 54, 81-88.
Baum M. ( 1954) "Simple concept learning as a function of intralist generalization". J. Exp. Psychol., 47, 89-94.
Binder A., & Feldman S. E. ( 1960) "The effects of experimentally controlled experience upon recognition responses". Psychol. Monogr., 74, No. 9 (Whole No. 496).
Bourne L. E., Jr., & Restle F. ( 1959) "Mathematical theory of concept identification". Psychol. Rev., 66, 278-296.
Bower G. ( 1961) "Application of a model to paired-associate learning". Psychometrika, 26, 255-280.
Bruner J. S., Goodnow J. J., & Austin G. A. ( 1956) A study of thinking. New York: Wiley.
Bush R. R., & Mosteller F. ( 1955) Stochastic models for learning. New York: Wiley.
Chomsky N. ( 1957) Syntactic structures. The Hague: Mouton.
Chomsky N. ( 1959) Verbal behavior (a review of Skinner's book). Language, 35, 26-58.

-67-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Verbal Behavior and Learning: Problems and Processes: Proceedings
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 400

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.