Creating Television: Conversations with the People behind 50 Years of American TV

By Robert Kubey | Go to book overview

References

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Bruner, J. (1994). The “remembered” self. In U. Neisser & R. Fivush (Eds. ), The remembering self: Construction and accuracy in the self-narrative (pp. 41–54). New York: Cambridge University Press.

Cantor, M. C. (1971). The Hollywood TV producer: His work and his audience. New York: Basic Books.

Capra, F. (1971). The name above the title. New York: Macmillan.

Cawelti, J. G. (1976). Adventure, mystery, and romance: Formula stories as art and popular culture. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Conway, M. A., Rubin, D. C, Spinnler, H., & Wagenaar, W. (Eds. ) (1992). Theoretical perspectives on autobiographical memory. Dordrecht, Netherlands: Kluwer.

Corporation for Public Broadcasting. (1978). A qualitative study: The effect of television on peoples' lives. Washington, DC: Author.

Csikszentmihalyi, M. (1975). Beyond boredom and anxiety: The experience of play in work and games. San Francisco: Jossey-Boss.

Csikszentmihalyi, M., & Beattie, O. V. (1979). Life themes: A theoretical and empirical exploration of their origins and effects. Journal of Humanistic Psychology, 19, 45–63.

Daniel, D. K. (1996). Lou Grant: The making of TV's top newspaper drama. Syracuse, New York: Syracuse University Press.

Desser, D. (2000). The martial arts film in the 1990s. In W. W. Dixon (Ed. ), Film genre 2000: New critical essays (pp. 77–109). Albany: State University of New York Press.

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Creating Television: Conversations with the People behind 50 Years of American TV
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Creating Television - Conversations with the People Behind 50 Years of American Tv *
  • Chapter 1 - Bringing Television Creators to Life 1
  • Chapter 2 - Individual Creativity in a Collaborative Medium 9
  • Interviews 21
  • Chapter 3 - Creating the First Decade 23
  • Chapter 4 - Creating Breakthrough Television 121
  • Chapter 5 - A Different Kind of Writer 187
  • Chapter 6 - A Different Kind of Producer 231
  • Chapter 7 - Two Directors 283
  • Chapter 8 - The Actors 307
  • Chapter 9 - The Agents 395
  • Chapter 10 - A Different Kind of Executive 445
  • References 481
  • Photo Credits 485
  • Index 487
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