Biotechnology and Communication: The Meta-Technologies of Information

By Sandra Braman | Go to book overview

CHAPTER
3

Conditional Expectations Communication
and the Impact of Biotechnology 1
Steven S. Wildman
Michigan State University

Biotechnology is a potent source of hope and fear, both of which are illustrated in this book. At the core of each is the recognition that we are witnessing the creation of a technology that in the most literal sense is powerfully transformative. It is capable of transforming significant features of the living world around us and, because we are biological beings, capable of transforming its creators as well. Both the long-term environmental implications and the ethics of biotechnological interventions to alter the traits of individuals of other species and members of our own are hotly debated. The existence of factual support for arguments made on both sides of the debate makes it particularly difficult to resolve. Biotechnology advocates point to the benefits of the higher yields of genetically modified crops and the human suffering that can be alleviated by correcting medical problems caused by genetic defects. Biotechnology's critics counter by pointing to the dangers of unintended consequences in the larger ecological and societal contexts in which modified organisms are introduced; and the thought that parents might employ technological measures to determine (or at least influence) traits such as height, athletic ability, intelligence, or physical attractiveness, for their unborn offspring—the so-called designer baby—is deeply troubling to many. 2

Given such concerns, we might ask whether communication is a human trait that can be altered with biotechnology. There are at least two ways in which this could happen. Biotechnology might be used to alter the ge

-63-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Biotechnology and Communication: The Meta-Technologies of Information
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 297

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.