Understanding Williams Syndrome: Behavioral Patterns and Interventions

By Eleanor Semel; Sue R. Rosner | Go to book overview

Foreword
Ursulla Bellugi
Director, Laboratory for Cognitive Neuroscience
The Salk institute for Biological Studies

Twenty-five years ago Williams syndrome was almost completely unknown in the United States, although cited earlier in Europe under other names. Increasingly over the past decade, Williams syndrome is becoming more widely recognized and better understood. An intriguing behavioral profile, a host of medical difficulties, groundbreaking discoveries in neurogenetics, and the collaborative efforts of scientists representing disciplines from cognitive neuroscience to brain imaging and molecular genetics are providing the impetus for a flourishing field of research endeavors. The insights, dedication, and commitment of parents and educators have played a vital role in this process.

Questions as to the universality, uniqueness, and the distinctiveness of the behavioral characteristics of the syndrome are under intense investigation. Issues regarding the generality of the cognitive profile and the underlying bases for the unusual profile of peaks and valleys of abilities are being examined in depth. The consistency and variability in levels of performance within and between cognitive domains is under scrutiny by scientists in research institutions in various countries. The exciting task of investigating the relationships between behavior, underlying neurobiology, and genetics is now underway.

At the same time, there is growing recognition of the multiple problems that individuals with Williams syndrome and their families, teachers, and other professionals face in dealing with this condition: developmentally, socially, academically, vocationally, and personally, at all points in the life cycle. Challenges include handling the learning difficulties, behavior problems, and deficient life skills often associated with the syndrome, as well as knowing how to use the positive strengths to advantage within the classroom and other situations. This involves capitalizing on their skills and strengths in areas such as language, storytelling, music, face recognition, and sociability.

Both the advances in research knowledge and recognition of the challenges involved in dealing with Williams syndrome have resulted in an extensive, ever expanding literature. There is a proliferation of articles in scientific journals, papers, and symposia presented at meetings and conferences, book chapters, monographs, and occasional reviews of the research. Other major contributions are the informative pamphlets, newsletters, and helpful booklets with advice for parents and teachers published by the Williams Syndrome Associations in the United

-xiii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Understanding Williams Syndrome: Behavioral Patterns and Interventions
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • List of Figures v
  • List of Tables v
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword xiii
  • Preface xvii
  • Acknowledgments xxi
  • Chapter 1 - Introduction 1
  • Chapter 2 - Language Skills and Problems 15
  • Chapter 3 - Intervention Approaches for Language Problems 64
  • Chapter 4 - Perceptual and Motor Performance 108
  • Chapter 5 - Specific Aptitudes 187
  • Chapter 6 - Maladaptive Behaviors 252
  • Chapter 7 - Intervention Approaches for Maladaptive Behaviors 297
  • Chapter 8 - Summary and Conclusions 359
  • References 402
  • Appendix 420
  • Author Index 431
  • Subject Index 443
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 456

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.