Understanding Williams Syndrome: Behavioral Patterns and Interventions

By Eleanor Semel; Sue R. Rosner | Go to book overview

Preface

Back in the early 1990s, we began to write a single chapter to be included in a reference work on Williams syndrome. Initially, we focused on responses to our parent questionnaires on the behavioral characteristics of children with Williams syndrome, the related literature, and interventions appropriate for children with this condition in the areas of language, perceptual-motor performance, aptitudes, maladaptive behaviors, and academic skills.

Over the past decade, our venture underwent one metamorphosis after another as we continued on our own personal odyssey toward “Understanding Williams Syndrome. ” One chapter became several and then an entire book, reflecting many of the major developments in the field of Williams syndrome. These include the emergence of significant topics, issues, and trends; identification of various problems and skills of individuals with Williams syndrome within each survey area; and the complex interaction between research and clinical practice.

Generally, progress begins with observations and comments by parents, teachers, other professionals and researchers that lead to the development of laboratory studies, testing procedures, and relevant interventions. This is epitomized in the enormous effort exerted to determine the level of ability displayed in the various components of language by children with Williams syndrome. Such findings suggested new ways to help them. Discovery of their narrative talents and love of performing led us to use storytelling, puppetry, and improvisation as psycho-educational techniques for the teaching of social skills. The receptiveness of many children with Williams syndrome to verbal reasoning and explanations inspired us to introduce “problem analysis” as an intervention strategy, especially in the area of maladaptive behavior. Their grasp of semantic relatedness influenced our use of association cues and simple metaphors as learning tools; their language and memory skills convinced us early on that self-talk is a very potent form of verbal mediation and behavioral control.

The “empathy” of individuals with Williams syndrome is another cogent example of how observations and parent reports, including responses to one item in our Utah Survey, have been extended by laboratory studies of empathy, as well as ways of channeling such sensitivities into adaptive kinds of behavior.

The saga of musicality provides a classic example of these connections between research and practice. Initial reports concerning the musical interests and talents of individuals with Williams syndrome were crucial to efforts to provide opportunities for the development and recognition of their musical skills. These efforts, in turn, led to laboratory studies examining such abilities as absolute pitch,

-xvii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Understanding Williams Syndrome: Behavioral Patterns and Interventions
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • List of Figures v
  • List of Tables v
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword xiii
  • Preface xvii
  • Acknowledgments xxi
  • Chapter 1 - Introduction 1
  • Chapter 2 - Language Skills and Problems 15
  • Chapter 3 - Intervention Approaches for Language Problems 64
  • Chapter 4 - Perceptual and Motor Performance 108
  • Chapter 5 - Specific Aptitudes 187
  • Chapter 6 - Maladaptive Behaviors 252
  • Chapter 7 - Intervention Approaches for Maladaptive Behaviors 297
  • Chapter 8 - Summary and Conclusions 359
  • References 402
  • Appendix 420
  • Author Index 431
  • Subject Index 443
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 456

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.