Handbook of Distance Education

By Michael Grahame Moore; William G. Anderson | Go to book overview

21
From Teletraining to e-Learning and
Knowledge Management
Alan G. Chute
Avaya Inc.
achute@avaya.com

INTRODUCTION

In today's Information Age, learning in the corporate environment is no longer confined within the four walls of a corporate classroom. The instructor, armed with a textbook, is no longer the sole resource in the learning experience. Information resources are everywhere, and people need access to these resources at anytime and from anywhere. The emerging corporate learning environment is envisioned as a system for connecting learners with these distributed learning resources.

Because of the exponential growth of the importance of information and continuous learning in our society, corporations are creating new and more powerful ways to manage knowledge resources and provide distance learning experiences. Corporations are migrating from stand-alone teletraining, distance learning, and knowledge management initiatives to integrated e-learning solutions. In my opinion the integration of distance learning (DL) and knowledge management (KM) is e-learning (see Fig. 21.1). The Webster dictionary defines “e-” as a prefix that can mean among other things “thoroughly” as in . I define e-learning as “a strategy for connecting learners with distributed knowledge resources. ”

It is widely recognized that the acceleration in the development and deployment of innovative e-learning systems will be astonishing in the next few years. In fact, John Chambers, CEO of Cisco Systems, a recognized leader in the expansion of the Internet, told the New York Times in November 1999 that learning will be the next “killer application” for computer technology. He went on to say that e-learning “will make email look like rounding error. ” In other words, the impact and scope of e-learning will be huge.


BACKGROUND

Our legacy educational systems were designed to meet the impact of the needs of the Industrial Age and are now attempting to meet the needs of the Information Age. Learning resources are no longer tightly controlled, rather they are readily accessible from knowledge resources

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