Handbook of Distance Education

By Michael Grahame Moore; William G. Anderson | Go to book overview

22
Video-Based Instruction in Distance
Learning: From Motion Pictures to
the Internet
Robert A. Wisher
U. S. Army Research Institute
wisher@ari.army.mil
Christina K. Curnow
Caliber Associates
curnowc@calib.com

Video-based instruction is a common denominator in many forms of distance learning. Although correspondence courses have played a larger overall role, instruction delivered through video has been a mainstay in distance learning since the early days of the black and white educational film (Freeman, 1923). The Internet is revitalizing the use of video for instructional purposes. The race is on to create streaming technologies using Internet protocol packets for delivering high-fidelity, full motion video to the desktop. Throughout the past century, an underlying assumption has been that video can be a vital ingredient to learning.

There is little doubt that a well-designed video component stimulates the interest level of students. Plainly, though, video is not essential for all distance learning. Successful examples of learning from phonographic recordings (Rulon, 1943), educational radio (Woelfel & Tyler, 1945), tape-recorded lectures (Popham, 1961), and audio teletraining (Wisher & Priest, 1998) have demonstrated the efficacy of voice alone or voice with printed materials, to name just a few alternatives to video. How necessary the inclusion of video, particularly high-quality video, is to the process of learning from a distance is debatable. As with many issues, the answer depends. It depends on the types of tasks being taught, the individual characteristics of the students, the role of the instructor, and the instructional alternatives available.

This chapter reviews the important findings on the impact of video-based instruction on learning. The main focus is on distance learning, but there are many forms of learning. These include the psychological, persuasive, and vicarious aspects of video communication. Considered to a lesser extent in this chapter, then, is the impact on learning from exposure to mass video communications, such as learning during casual television viewing. Although such environments might lack the formal structure and design of distance learning, they can sway opinion, influence behavior, and alter mannerisms and attitudes. These also are examples of learning from video.

The acquisition and modification of knowledge must be enduring, and learners must become capable of performing actions they could not perform beforehand. Distance learning refers to

-315-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Handbook of Distance Education
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 872

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.