Handbook of Distance Education

By Michael Grahame Moore; William G. Anderson | Go to book overview

23
Frameworks for Research, Design,
Benchmarks, Training, and
Pedagogy in Web-Based
Distance Education
Curtis J. Bonk
Indiana University
cjbonk@indiana.edu
Vanessa Dennen
San Diego State University
vdennen@mail.sdsu.edu

INTRODUCTION

Administrators in higher education face decisions about what resources, activities, tools, partners, and markets are important to Web-based courses. Decisions in these areas can dramatically impact the effectiveness of Web-based instruction.

It is our premise here that, before forging ahead with new partnerships and marketing initiatives, an overall plan or perspective as well as many subplans or ideas for Web-based learning1 are needed. Consequently, in this chapter, we provide a set of frameworks from which to reflect e-learning practices and opportunities. Additionally, we detail a number of pedagogical practices intended to make the frameworks come alive.


COLLEGE INSTRUCTOR ONLINE LEARNING SURVEY

A recent survey of college faculty cosponsored by JonesKnowledge.com and CourseShare.com found that the barriers to e-learning in most college settings included time to learn the technology, shortages of instructional development grants and stipends, limited recognition by departments and institutions in promotion and tenure decisions, and minimal instructional design support (Bonk, 2001). According to this study, recognition, collaboration, technical support, online sharing of pedagogical practices, and instructional design assistance are all ways to increase the adoption of Web-based technologies in college teaching. Such findings

____________________
1
In this chapter, we interchangeably use the terms online learning, Web-based learning, and e-learning. Such terms refer to online instruction and distance learning made possible by the World Wide Web.

-331-

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