Parental Control of Television Broadcasting

By Monroe E. Price; Stefaan G. Verhulst | Go to book overview

2
Rating Systems:
Comparative Country
Analysis and
Recommendations

At the core of every parental control mechanism lies its rating or labelling system. That system both identifies the appropriateness of media content for children and determines the means by which children's access to that content may be controlled. Rating systems define whether a programme can be shown within the watershed, how it should be encoded for a specific technical device, and what type of visual warning system should be used. They should give sufficient information to empower parents to make efficient and deliberative decisions concerning children's access to media content. The challenge of every rating design is thus to develop a system complex enough to give relatively detailed information about a programme, but still simple enough for both labellers and parents to use.

In this chapter, we aim to furnish adequate data for analysing and evaluating the design of rating systems. We do not ultimately rate the rating systems. That cannot be fully done, since each rating system is the product of its own history, its own background in areas such as cinema ratings, its own tradition of monopolistic public service broadcasting and transitions to private broadcasting, and its own historical sense of government imposition of taste as a form of political censorship. In a report written in 1996, Joel Federman emphasises that the best remedy for mass media evils may not be ratings. He proposes that there are methods for ‘minimising the risks and maximising the usefulness’ of rating systems (Federman 1996: Conclusions and Recommendations).

Ratings are often the product of industry fear of harsher measures, demanded by a public in the wake of a spectacular crisis, for example, but can also be

-43-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Parental Control of Television Broadcasting
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 314

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.