Political Psychology

By Kristen Renwick Monroe | Go to book overview

Political Psychology: An Overview KRISTEN R. MONROE
University of California, Irvine

What is political psychology? How does it differ from political science and from other branches of psychology? What are its key concepts, methodologies, and texts? What are the main research topics, fields, and controversies that enliven political psychology, giving it both passion and value in our immediate lives, as well as in our scholarship? These were the questions posed to the contributors to a volume that I hope will both inform the newcomer and chart the direction for future scholarly research in this exciting field.

I must count myself a newcomer and confess that part of my interest in this project emanated from my own desire for answers to the questions posed above. In this, I have been amply rewarded by the contributors, who include some of the most distinguished scholars in the field. Moreover, their intellectual diversity means they have provided a richly diverse portrait of a common enterprise.1


Overview of the Book

Part 1 of the volume presents six contrasting views on political psychology as a field. The book opens with an updated and revised version of a classic article on the nature of political psychology, an article that helped define political psychology at a critical point in its inception. Deutsch and Kinnvall note the long philosophical heritage of political psychology and then

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1
In describing the chapters in this book, I relied heavily on the abstracts sent me by the authors themselves and tried to repeat their own characterizations of their work as much as possible. I apologize for those instances when I deviated from their own words and hope my rephrasings have not done undue harm to the specifics of the content. It has been a joy to work with these authors and a pleasure to be able to acknowledge publicly my great personal and intellectual debt.

-1-

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Political Psychology
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