Political Psychology

By Kristen Renwick Monroe | Go to book overview

12
Institutional Organization of Choice
Spaces: A Political Conception
of Political Psychology
SIMON JACKMAN
PAUL M. SNIDERMAN
Stanford University

It is uncontroversial that a psychologically oriented study of politics must be politically grounded. Yet it is undeniably controversial whether a politically oriented study of politics can be psychologically grounded. To many students of politics, explanations of political choices that follow from expressly psychological premises, if not strictly a category error, seem reductionist, tone-deaf to what makes politics a distinctive domain of behavior.

Part of the problem is obvious. It is hard to take seriously the claim that psychology should be treated as a foundational science for the study of human behavior when its leading ideas and vocabulary exhibit a rapid fashion cycle. But the problem goes deeper. Real politics involves commitment, values, judgment. Politics is an area of life that can evoke people's deepest emotions: allegiances, identification, the application of their principles to controversial choices, their judgment of the intentions and qualities of allies and opponents—their honesty, trustworthiness, competence, aggressiveness and the like. It would be odd indeed if, to make use of an older language, the study of the passions and the interests had nothing to learn from psychological inquiry.

Accordingly, our objective is constructive, not critical. We begin by outlining, briefly, the principal opposing positions— internalist and externalist,

-209-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Political Psychology
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 456

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.