Runoff Elections in the United States

By Charles S. Bullock III; Loch K. Johnson | Go to book overview
Save to active project

Notes

Preface
1.
See Riker, Liberalism against Populism, pp. 74-77; Duncan Black, The Theory of Committees and Elections.
2.
Letter to the New York Times, September 11, 1990, p. A18.
3.
Merrill, Making Multicandidate Elections More Democratic. Prior to adopting the runoff, Alabama used a variant of approval voting in which voters indicated their first and second choices. If no candidate received a majority, the least popular candi- date was eliminated and his or her votes were allocated to the voters' second prefer- ences. This process of eliminating the relatively unpopular candidates and reallocating their votes continued until one candidate had a majority.

Chapter 1
1.
See Lush, "Primary Elections and Majority Nominations," p. 43.
2.
Alexander, "The Double Primary," p. 234.
3.
Black, "A Theory of Southern Factionalism," p. 601.
4.
See, generally, Ewing, Primary Elections in the South, pp. 4-7; Ladd, Ameri- can Political Parties, pp. 137-39; Key, Southern Politics, pp. 416-23. For a claim that southerners adopted the runoff to help preserve the racial status quo, see Kousser, "Historical Origins," p. 8. Earl Black's analysis of southern gubernatorial primaries found that from 1945 to 1964 the runoff generally resulted in the nomination of the more outspoken advocate of segregation. In some contests a candidate who ran as a racial moderate swerved to the right in the runoff and charged his opponent with be- ing soft on segregation. Since 1964, the black vote has become sufficiently large so that serious gubernatorial candidates have generally eschewed racial appeals (Black, Southern Governors).

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Runoff Elections in the United States
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 206

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?