Attitudes and Opinions

By Stuart Oskamp; P. Wesley Schultz | Go to book overview

15
International Attitudes

Wars begin in the minds of men.—UNESCO Charter.

Peace, in the sense of the absence of war, is of little value to someone who is dying of hunger. … Peace can only last where human rights are respected, where the people are fed, and where individuals and nations arefree.—The Dalai Lama.

O wad some Power the giftie gie us To see oursel's as ithers see us.—Robert Burns.

This chapter discusses people's attitudes toward other nations and their images of foreign peoples. How are these attitudes developed, and to what extent are they stereotyped or based on limited sources of information? Attitudes concerning war and internationalism are central topics here, and attitudes toward terrorism have become a new focus since the 2001 attacks on the World Trade Center. Other topics covered include the kinds of people who tend to develop warlike attitudes or isolationistic viewpoints. Finally, how do international attitudes change over time?

If you agree that wars begin in people's minds, the importance of international attitudes is clear. Because a nuclear war could devastate the whole planet and possibly wipe out all human life, nations' warlike actions and the beliefs and attitudes that lead up to them are literally life-and-death issues for all of us. In addition, nations' preparations for preventing or fighting a war have an overpowering impact on everything else they do or don't do, as illustrated in this quotation (Hiatt & Atkinson, 1985):

By 1990, nearly enough will have been spent on defense during the Cold War—$3.7 trillion in constant 1972 dollars—to buy everything in the U. S. except the land: every house, factory, train, plane and refrigerator, (p. Al)

In 1995, the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) estimated that it would cost an additional $34 billion per year to pay for the unmet worldwide needs for basic child health and nutrition, primary education, safe water and sanitation, and family planning. In comparison, the world spent $800 billion per year on military expenses, so about 2 weeks' worth of military expenditures would have covered all of those needs of children around the world.

Much of what we have already learned about political attitudes applies directly to international affairs. However, there are some special ways in which international attitudes are unique. One characteristic feature is that many people's attitudes are formed despite their having little or no direct contact with other nations, foreigners, or issues of foreign affairs. As a result, the attitudes may be quite unrelated to the realities of world affairs. Of course all of our attitudes are based on our perception of the environment rather than on the actual, objective situation. But in the field of foreign affairs, the gap between perception and reality is apt to be especially large.

-345-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Attitudes and Opinions
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 578

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.