Attitudes and Opinions

By Stuart Oskamp; P. Wesley Schultz | Go to book overview
Save to active project

16
Racism and Prejudice

There is no more evil thing in this present world than race prejudice, none at all. It justifies and holds together more baseness, cruelty, and abomination than any other sort of error in the world.—H. G. Wells.

No State shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States; nor shall any State deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.—The Fourteenth Amendment to the U. S. Constitution.

The status of black Americans today can be characterized as a glass that is half full—if measured by progress since 1939—or as a glass that is half empty—if measured by the persisting disparities between black and white Americans since the early 1970s. Gerald D. Jaynes & Robin M. Williams, Jr., 1989.

Americans like to think of the U. S. as “one nation… with liberty and justice for all. However, despite these high ideals, our nation has a long history of intolerance, injustice, and violence—first toward the Native Americans, and then toward a succession of immigrant groups, each of which had to struggle to gain the freedom, equality, and justice guaranteed to them by the Constitution. To cite just one example, anti-Catholicism was rampant in all of the American colonies settled by Protestants, even leading to the execution of priests. It grew even stronger when large numbers of Catholic immigrants began arriving in the nineteenth century. Powerful groups formed the violently anti-Catholic Know-Nothing Party, and later the Ku Klux Klan persecuted Catholics as well as blacks and Jews. Although the Irish, Italians, Poles, and other immigrant groups gradually gained local political power, on the national scene New York Governor Alfred Smith's Catholicism doomed his presidential bid in 1928 and stirred up more anti-Catholic violence. Even in 1960, John F. Kennedy nearly lost the presidential election because of anti-Catholic sentiment and votes. Since then, those passions have mostly evaporated, but it was 1979 before a Pope could be entertained in the White House and welcomed as a visitor by Americans of all religious persuasions (Morrow, 1979).


BACKGROUND OF RACE RELATIONS IN THE U. S.

This chapter on prejudice and discrimination focuses mostly on race relations involving black Americans, the group that was stigmatized most severely by slavery in America and later by legalized “Jim Crow” segregation. However, it is important to realize that fairly similar accounts could be written about religious persecution, not only against Catholics but also against Jews, Muslims, and others, and about ethnic, racial, and national prejudice against Hispanics, Asians, Native Americans, Irish, Italians, and many other

-376-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Attitudes and Opinions
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 578

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.