Richard Nixon: The Shaping of His Character

By Fawn M. Brodie | Go to book overview

XX

McCarthy

I think McCarthyism has been created by Truman. I believe it is the creature of Truman.

- RICHARD NIXON, AUGUST 29, 1952 1

SEN. JOSEPH MCCARTHY and Richard Nixon both went into political oblivion condemned for multiple untruth. McCarthy in 1954 was censured by his peers, the sixth such censure in Senate history. * Nixon, who watched the spectacle from the Speaker's chair just after the election of 1954, chose to resign twenty years later when it came his turn to face the Senate as a court. He had seen one man's ordeal. McCarthy had been Nixon's political, although not his personal protégé, and they were for many months, in Roy Cohn's words, "quite cordial." 2 They went hand in hand in 1952, competing for the invention of the most slanderous epithet, the most degrading metaphor, in their efforts to defeat Adlai Stevenson. Where Nixon called Stevenson a weakling, a waster, a small-caliber Truman, an appeaser who "got his Ph. D. from Dean Acheson's College of Cowardly Communist Containment," McCarthy said, "If you will get me a slippery-elm club and put me aboard Stevenson's campaign train, I will use it on his advisers and perhaps I can make a good American out of him." 3

They urged each other's election and Nixon gave McCarthy the use of his files. But by 1954 Nixon was mortified to see McCarthy attacking Eisenhower—extending "twenty years of treason," his epithet for the Democratic party, to twenty-one

____________________
*
Timothy Pickering of Massachusetts was censured in 1811 for violating secrecy; Benjamin Tappan in 1844 for furnishing confidential documents to a newspaper; John McLauren and Benjamin Tillman in 1902 for fighting on the Senate floor; Hiram Bingham in 1929 for employing a manufacturing representative in writing a tariff bill. McCarthy received a "censure" vote, but this was changed to "condemnation" afterward because the word "censure" had not appeared in the original resolution.

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Richard Nixon: The Shaping of His Character
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Richard Nixon - The Shaping of His Character *
  • Contents *
  • Foreword *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • I - Man of Paradox *
  • II - The Oil in the Lemon Grove *
  • III - The Punishing Father *
  • IV - The Saintly Mother *
  • V - The Unsmiling Child *
  • VI - Splitting and Entitlement *
  • VII - Death and Two Brothers *
  • VIII - Presidential Fever *
  • IX - The Monastic Years *
  • X - The First Law Case: Failure *
  • XI - A Problem with Touching *
  • XII - Fighting Quaker *
  • XIII - The Dragon Slayer *
  • XIV - The First Informer *
  • XV - The Impact of Whittaker Chambers *
  • XVI - The Destruction of Alger Hiss *
  • XVII - On Women and Power: Pat and the Pink Lady *
  • XVIII - Nixon Among the Giants *
  • XIX - Checkers *
  • XX - Mccarthy *
  • XXI - Stevenson and Nixon *
  • XXII - Prelude to Vietnam *
  • XXIII - Hidden Problems: the Early Surfacing *
  • XXIV - Death Wishes *
  • XXV - On the Throwing of Rocks *
  • XXVI - Khrushchev *
  • XXVII - The Assassination Track *
  • XXVIII - Nixon and Kennedy *
  • XXIX - A Problem with Donald *
  • XXX - The Drubbing *
  • XXXI - The Private Man *
  • XXXII - The New York Years *
  • XXXIII - A Series of Accidents *
  • XXXIV - The Nixon Character *
  • Notes *
  • Bibliography *
  • Interviews *
  • Index *
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