Nature and Nurture: The Complex Interplay of Genetic and Environmental Influences on Human Behavior and Development

By Cynthia Garcia Coll; Elaine L. Bearer et al. | Go to book overview

11
Embodied Development:
Ending the Nativism-
Empiricism Debate
Willis F. Overton
Temple University

In this chapter, I discuss the importance of the concept of embodiment in the understanding of human behavior and development. My general argument is that embodiment is central to any discussion of the relation of biological systems and psychological systems or cultural systems and psychological systems. I also argue that seriously embracing the concept of embodiment represents a move away from unproductive questions entailed in the nativism-empiricism or nature-nurture debate and toward a more productive arena of inquiry and research—the examination of questions of the nature of the relations that operate among biological systems, psychological systems, and cultural systems. In developing this argument, I first discuss the role metatheory—especially relational metatheory—plays in contexualizing the concept of embodiment. I then discuss embodiment as a concept that bridges biological, cultural, and person-centered approaches to psychological inquiry. And finally, I focus on a brief elaboration of the place and nature of the embodied person-centered approach.

Most simply stated, embodiment is the affirmation that the lived body counts in our psychology. It is not a split-off disengaged agent that simply moves around peeking at a preformed world and drawing meaning directly from that world. It is not a set of genes that causes behavior, nor a brain, nor a culture. Behavior emerges from the embodied person actively engaged in the world. The concept of embodiment was first fully articulated in psychology by Maurice Merleau-Ponty (1962. 1963), and it represents a movement away from any dichotomous understanding of

-201-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Nature and Nurture: The Complex Interplay of Genetic and Environmental Influences on Human Behavior and Development
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 253

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.