Birds; Lysistrata; Assembly-Women; Wealth

By Stephen Halliwell; Aristophanes | Go to book overview

NOTE ON THE TRANSLATION

Since there is as yet no wholly satisfactory edition of the Greek text of all Aristophanes' plays, my translations of individual works are based (though not rigidly) on separate editions, in most cases those of the Oxford series of commentaries on the plays. For the present volume these are: N. Dunbar (ed. ), Aristophanes Birds (Oxford, I995), J. Henderson (ed. ), Aristophanes Lysistrata (Oxford, 1987), R. G. Ussher (ed. ), Aristophanes Ecclesiazusae (Oxford, 1973) [= Assembly-Wornen], and, for Wealth, V. Coulon (ed. ), Aristophane, v (Paris, 1963). Readers familiar with later dramatic texts may be surprised to learn that among the respects in which legitimate editorial disagreements over the text of Aristophanes can still occur is the attribution of lines to speakers in certain passages. Comparison with other translations of Birds, in particular, is likely to reveal significant variations in the utterances attributed to Peisetairos and Euelpides in the first part of the play; this is an area where my indebtedness to Dunbar's recent edition makes a material difference. Some of the more important of my divergences from the editions cited above will be indicated in the Explanatory Notes (see e.g. note 3 to my Introduction to Assembly-Women).

In accordance with the principles explained in the section of the Introduction entitled 'Translating Aristophanes', my translation follows the form of the Greek text closely. However, because the marginal numbers in the translation refer to the standard numeration of the Greek text, and since this numeration is sometimes (mostly in lyric passages) anomalous, readers should be warned that the sequence occasionally does not match exactly the printed lines of the translation itself. For consistency of reference, line numbers in the General Introduction, the Introductions to individual plays, and the Index of Names refer to the strict Greek numeration. However, line numbers as given in the lemmata to Explanatory Notes have, where necessary, been slightly adjusted for the convenience of the user of the translation.

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Birds; Lysistrata; Assembly-Women; Wealth
Table of contents

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  • Aristophanes - Birds Lysistrata Assembly-Women Wealth *
  • Preface *
  • Contents *
  • Introduction - Aristophanes' Career in Context *
  • Note on the Translation *
  • Select Bibliography *
  • Chronology *
  • Introduction *
  • Birds *
  • Introduction *
  • Lysistrata *
  • Introduction *
  • Assembly-Women *
  • Introduction *
  • Wealth *
  • Explanatory Notes *
  • Index of Names *
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