Birds; Lysistrata; Assembly-Women; Wealth

By Stephen Halliwell; Aristophanes | Go to book overview

SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY
These suggestions for further reading are restricted to items written in, or translated into, English. Preference has generally been given to more recent and more accessible publications, through which, for those interested, older and more specialized secondary literature can be traced. I have tried, none the less, to give guidance to a reasonably wide range of publications, suitably flagged so that readers can follow up as much or as little as suits their interests. References to works which contain untranslated Greek have been minimized but not altogether excluded. Full publication details of books are given only at the first citation.
GENERAL WORKS
The most dependable introductions to Aristophanes and his genre are
Dover, K. J., Aristophanic Comedy (Berkeley and Los Angeles, 1972).
Handley, E. W., 'Comedy', in P. E. Easterling and B. M. W. Knox (eds. ), The Cambridge History of Classical Literature, i. Greek Literature (Cambridge, 1985), 355-425.
MacDowell, D. M., Aristophanes and Athens (Oxford, 1995).
A lively book aimed specifically at sixth-formers and students is
Cartledge, P., Aristophanes and his Theatre of the Absurd (London, 1990).
Two effusive books which try to illuminate Old Comedy by modem comparisons, but are often free-wheeling and not to be trusted on details, are
McLeish, K., The Theatre of Aristophanes (London, 1980).
Reckford, K., Aristophanes' Old-and-New Comedy (Chapel Hill, NC, 1987).
A book full of ideas but often arbitrary in its interpretations is
Whitman, C. H., Aristophanes and the Comic Hero (Cambridge, Mass., 1964).
Various aspects of Aristophanes' literary technique are lucidly discussed in
Harriott, R., Aristophanes Poet and Dramatist (London, 1986).
An advanced discussion of all the plays, whose angle of approach (often stimulating, sometimes strained) is indicated by its title, is
Bowie, A. M., Aristophanes: Myth, Ritual and Comedy (Cambridge, 1993).
There is a recent collection of essays, several of which are cited separately below, in

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