Environmentalism for a New Millennium: The Challenge of Coevolution

By Leslie Paul Thiele | Go to book overview

1
From Conservation
to Coevolution

First Wave: The Genesis of Conservation

Faced with nearly two billion acres of land available for westward expansion, the early settlers of America eyed a vast resource awaiting exploitation. The rapid development of much of this land was to be expected. Within relatively short order, signs of widespread degradation were evident. By the mid-1700s, a Swedish naturalist traveling in America could complain bitterly about the depletion of the soil's fertility and the lack of concern for natural and agricultural science among the colonists. He observed that “since the arrival of great crowds of Europeans, things are greatly changed; the country is well peopled, and the woods are cut down. The people, increasing in this country, have by hunting and shooting in part extirpated the birds, in part frightened them away. In spring the people steal eggs, mothers and young indifferently, because no regulations are made to the contrary. And if any had been made, the spirit of freedom which prevails in the country would not suffer them to be obeyed. ” The naturalist concluded his account: “I found everywhere the wisdom and goodness of the Creator; but too seldom saw any inclination to make use of them or adequate estimation of them among men. ” 1 The problem, evidently, was not simply that the European colonists of America cared less for the land than did the native peoples. Even relative to European standards, American settlers acted irresponsibly in their relationship to the land.

-3-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Environmentalism for a New Millennium: The Challenge of Coevolution
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Acknowledgements *
  • Preface ix
  • Contents xiii
  • Introduction xvii
  • 1 - From Conservation to Coevolution 3
  • 2 - Interdependence and Sustainable Development 30
  • 3 - Generational Interdependence across Time 62
  • 4 - Social Interdependence across Space 113
  • 5 - Ecological Interdependence across Species 166
  • 6 - Environmentalism for a New Millennium 202
  • Appendix - Notes on the Methodology and Interviews 229
  • Notes 235
  • Selected Bibliography 279
  • Index 297
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 302

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.