20

THE TAINTED SOURCES OF THE BELL CURVE

Charles Lane


I

For all the shock value of its assertion that blacks are intractably, and probably biologically, inferior in intelligence to whites and Asians, The Bell Curve is not quite an original piece of research. It is, in spite of all the controversy that is attending its publication, only a review of the literature—an elaborate interpretation of data culled from the work of other social scientists. For this reason, the credibility of its authors, Charles Murray and Richard J. Herrnstein, rests significantly on the credibility of their sources.

The press and television have for the most part taken The Bell Curve's extensive bibliography and footnotes at face value. And, to be sure, many of the book's data are drawn from relatively reputable academic sources, or from neutral ones such as the Census Bureau. Certain of the book's major factual contentions are not in dispute— such as the claim that blacks consistently have scored lower than whites on IQ tests, or that affirmative action generally promotes minorities who scored lower on aptitude tests than whites. And obviously intelligence is both to some degree definable and to some degree heritable.

The interpretation of those data, however, is very much in dispute. So, too, are the authors' conclusions that little or nothing can or should be done to raise the ability of the IQ-impaired since so

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