The Education of John Randolph

By Robert Dawidoff | Go to book overview

INTRODUCTION

This volume concerns that remarkable and eccentric character John Randolph of Roanoke (1773-1833), the Virginia congressman and advocate of the rights of the slaveholding states. The scrutiny of Randolph's education, I believe, yields a sound version of his methods and his motives. He was raised according to the lights of Virginia's golden age and spent his life trying to square the lessons he had absorbed with the contrary facts of the democratic America in which he found himself. The sustained conflict Randolph experienced between his expectations and the circumstances of his adult life gave his politics energy and a theme which we would do well to understand if we wish to understand him. Randolph had a very literal mind. He never learned how to compromise. He preserved the codes and attitudes of his Anglo-Virginian upbringing intact and reacted to the world in terms of those old-fashioned home truths. Both his political ideas and his memorably dramatic advocacy of them developed from his peculiar refusal to change with the times. What commenced as a promising and brilliant career in governing stumbled over this refusal. Randolph abandoned ambition, as commonly understood, for a stance of lonely opposition. We remember him as a critic of his day. This book is about his happening to

-ii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Education of John Randolph
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Education of John Randolph *
  • Contents *
  • Introduction ii
  • 1 - John Randolph of Roanoke 21
  • 2 - Upbringing 68
  • 3 - Randolph's Reading: Cultural Education 115
  • 4 - Political Education 145
  • 5 - Randolph's First Congressional Career 164
  • 6 - Breakdown and Reaction 198
  • 7 - Randolph of Roanoke: "The Warden on the Lonely Hill" 239
  • Conclusion 293
  • Acknowledgments 304
  • Notes 307
  • Bibliography 333
  • Index 339
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 346

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.