Handbook of Crisis Counseling, Intervention, and Prevention in the Schools

By Jonathan Sandoval | Go to book overview

Preface to the Second Edition

The first edition of this book filled a gap in the preparation and education of many school-based professionals. It not only became assigned reading in various graduate programs but enjoyed success among several school-based practitioners: school psychologists, school counselors, school social workers, school nurses, and administrative staff. Events since the early 1990s have led to an even greater appreciation of the school as a place where traumatic events may OCCUT and, consequently, of the need for information of this type. In addition, policymakers in schools have begun to realize how much learning is effected by the conditions that children face in their homes and neighborhoods. Children need support for their learning in the form of crisis intervention and prevention.

This edition updates the original edition and introduces five new chapters: diversity in crisis intervention, bullying, violence and disaster, rape and sexual assault, and eating disorders. While covering new ground, the central message of these chapters remains the same: School guidance personnel can do much to reduce children's stress and to facilitate their coping and healthy development. Along with the chapters contributors, I feel confident that this book provides the kind of information and inspiration that is needed to reach these goals.


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I wish to thank Carla Lacy for her support in the preparation of the manuscript for the book and Davis students Lisa Krause, who provided library research, and Joanna Abbott, Jennifer Grimes, Tim Larrabee, and Dorine Waidtlow, who helped in reviewing chapters. I also wish to acknowledge the support of Lane Akers at Lawrence Erlbaum Associates for seeing this project through to completion.

Tonathan Sandoval

-vii-

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