Close Romantic Relationships: Maintenance and Enhancement

By John H. Harvey; Amy Wenzel | Go to book overview

17
How Well Do You Mind Your
Relationship? A Preliminary Scale to
Test the Minding Theory of Relating
Julia Omarzu
Southwestern Community College, Iowa
Joanne Whalen John H. Harvey
The University of Iowa

Satisfying close relationships are important to individuals' mental and physical health. One of the most valued types of relationships is built with an intimate, romantic partner. There has been a great deal of investigation into how individuals choose such partners, but there is still much to be understood about how romantic partnerships are maintained over the long term. In a society where one out of two marriages will likely end in divorce, a theory of relationships that delineates the factors leading to long-lasting, satisfying partnerships could be beneficial to many people searching for such relationships.

Harvey and Omarzu (1997, 1999) proposed such a theory. The Minding Theory of relationships suggests that various types of expectations and cognitive patterns are conducive to satisfying close relationships. The idea that cognition is important to relationships is not new. Many experts have written about the importance of attribution in relationships (e.g., Bradbury & Fincham, 1990; Kelley, 1979; Orvis, Kelley, & Butler, 1976). Murray, Holmes, and Griffin (1996) presented evidence that the cognitive representations successful romantic partners have of each other may be idealistic, even unrealistic. Altman and Taylor's (1973) early social penetration theory addressed the importance of sharing increasingly intimate knowledge about each other, including thoughts, feelings, and attitudes. However, previous research focuses on specific aspects of relationship behavior or attitudes. The Minding Theory builds on many of these ideas, creating a theory that attempts to predict overall relationship satisfaction. There are

-345-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Close Romantic Relationships: Maintenance and Enhancement
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 400

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.