Communications Satellites: Global Change Agents

By Joseph N. Pelton; Robert J. Oslund et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER TWO
Satellites Technology: The Evolution
of Satellite Systems and Fixed Satellite Services
Louis Ippolito
ITT Industries
Joseph N. Pelton
The George Washington University

The synchronous satellite is an absurdly simple idea, and involves no real paradox. It is not really motionless, for it is actually moving along its orbit at almost seven thousand miles an hour. At this precise speed it just keeps up with a point on the earth's spinning equator, far below and it just overcomes the pull of gravity as well.

—Arthur C. Clarke (1967, p. 140)

One can begin the story of satellite technology in many different points in history. For example, in the third century BC, Arcetus of Tarentum developed a working concept of jet propulsion on which today's rockets are still based. This remarkable achievement used steam and his projectiles were wooden pigeons, but the basic physics are still much the same at the start of the 21st century. However, these basic concepts on rocket propulsion were to be lost in the centuries that followed the remarkable discoveries of Arcetus.

Some 20 centuries later, none other than Sir Isaac Newton published the first theoretical account of how an artificial satellite could be launched into earth's orbit. In his discussion about physics and gravitational effects, Newton actually drew a diagram showing how an artificial satellite could be launched into earth's orbit. He maintained that this feat could be accomplished with the “moral equivalent” of a large cannon that had sufficient launch velocity (i.e., muzzle velocity) and the right elevation angle.

Many other visions of satellite networks followed the writings of Newton, both in works of fact and fiction. H. G. Wells, Everett Edward Hale, Jules Verne,

-33-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Communications Satellites: Global Change Agents
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 387

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.