A Key to Modern British Poetry

By Lawrence Durrell | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 6
GEORGIANS AND IMAGISTS

OSCAR WILDE and Ernest Dowson died in 1900, the one age forty-four, the other thirty-three. Lionel Johnson died in 1902 aged thirty-five. John Davidson committed suicide in 1909, while Francis Thompson died in 1907 aged forty-eight. Those who lived on--and many like Yeats, Bridges, Thomas Hardy and Kipling lived on for twenty or thirty more years of active production--did not receive their full measure of recognition until later. But the era of flowers and fancies ended at the beginning of the century. Dandyism as a code of behaviour ended somewhat earlier--most likely about the time of the prosecution of Oscar Wilde. New names were beginning to be heard. New poets began to occupy the empty seats at the Cheshire Cheese.

In a memoir upon Rupert Brooke, Sir Edward Marsh has described how, in the summer of 1912, the Georgian Movement was launched. The project was discussed at a lunch party in his rooms. Among the poets present were Rupert Brooke, John Drinkwater, W. W. Gibson, Harold Monro and Marsh himself. The idea took public shape in the first Georgian anthology of 1912 which made an immediate impression on the public. Though most of the poets were new, a few established names were to be found in the pages of this and subsequent anthologies. John Masefield was one. The popularity of the Georgian collections continued unabated for a number of years, and the movement might be said to have come to an end somewhere around 1922. But it was something more than just a movement; the intelligence of Harold Monro and

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A Key to Modern British Poetry
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments vi
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Chapter I The Limits of Criticism 1
  • Chapter 2- Space Time and Poetry 24
  • Chapter 3- The World Within 49
  • Chapter 4- Beyond the Ego? 72
  • Chapter 5- Poetry in the Nineties 91
  • Chapter 6- Georgians and Imagists 119
  • Chapter 7- T. S. Eliot 143
  • Chapter 9- New Signatures, New Voices 178
  • Notes 209
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