Mass Media and Drug Prevention: Classic and Contemporary Theories and Research

By William D. Crano; Michael Burgoon | Go to book overview

6
Attention, Persuasive Communication,
and Prevention
Lewis Donohew, Philip Palmgreen, Elizabeth Lorch,
Rick Zimmerman, and Nancy Harrington
University of Kentucky

Humans are not the consistently aware, thoughtful creatures we often assume them to be, at least not until we can engage them in some way and lure or jolt them into a higher level of awareness (Bardo, Donohew, & Harrington, 1998; Donohew, Lorch & Palmgreen, 1998). Thus, changing their health behaviors is a formidable task. On the basis of research to date, we take the position that the human decision-making process may or may not be “rational. Many individuals may be more likely to choose to be in situations or to engage in behaviors that are novel, reduce boredom, lead to disinhibition, or are thrilling or adventuresome. Beyond this, many of those who find themselves in these sorts of situations are less likely to act in ways that might be predicted by rational models of health-related behavior.

A central assumption of the research described in this chapter is that in order for health messages to be seriously attended, they must be capable of attracting and holding attention long enough for persuasive content, which might involve more rational decision-making (e.g., Ajzen & Fishbein, 1980) to be processed. This requires that they provide enough stimulation to generate a level of attention many implicitly assume is present all the time. Given growing evidence of the influence of biology on behavior, we posit a somewhat more primal human than is implicitly assumed in some of the theories of human behavior. Thus, for example, the presence or absence of immediate reward may play a greater role in changing behavior than is generally thought. The importance of immediate reward may signal a problem in changing health behaviors. Unlike the advertiser

-119-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Mass Media and Drug Prevention: Classic and Contemporary Theories and Research
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 302

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.