The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant: April 1 - August 31, 1862 - Vol. 5

By John Y. Simon; Ulysses S. Grant | Go to book overview
DLC-USG, V, 15, 16, 82, 89; DNA, RG 393, USG Special Orders. O. R., I, x, part 2, 106.
2.
Brig. Gen. John McArthur was wounded on April 6 during the battle of Shiloh. Ibid., I, x, part 1, 158. On April 16, McArthur sent a brief report of casualties to USG. Ibid., p. 148. On April 25, USG endorsed this letter. "Respect- fully referred to headquarters of the department. From the casualties occurring in the Second Division it is not probable that any further reports than those now sent will be received." Ibid.

To Brig. Gen. William T. Sherman

Head Quarters, Dist. of West Ten.
Pittsburg, April 15th 1862

GEN. W. T. SHERMAN
COMD. G 5TH DIV.
GEN.

Order the 71 st Ohio vol. regiment to the landing ready to embark for Fort Donelson and Clarkesville to relieve the garrison at those two places.

They need not take any of their land transportation with them the supply of those garrisons being sufficient.

Instructions will be made out here for them.

I am Gen. very respectfully
your obt. svt.
U. S. GRANT
Maj. Gen. Com

ALS, Stephenson County Historical Society, Freeport, Ill. The same letter is entered as written by Maj. John A. Rawlins in DLC-USG, V, 2, 86; DNA, RG 393, USG Letters Sent. See following letter.

On April 16, 1862, Rawlins wrote to Col. Rodney Mason, 71st Ohio. "You will proceed with your Command to Fort. Donelson, Tenn. and relieve Col. Fouke and his Command of the Garrison duty of that place. In the Command of said place you will prevent all marauding and destroying of private property. The Citizens are not to be molested by our troops. Make severe examples of Company Commanders whose companies are guilty of such conduct. If necessary

send them to Head Quarters with charges, and request they be mustered out of the service. You will make or cause to be made Requisitions upon the Qr. Master and Commissary at Paducah, Ky. for such supplies as you may need for your command,

-45-

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