The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant: April 1 - August 31, 1862 - Vol. 5

By John Y. Simon; Ulysses S. Grant | Go to book overview

them from the force of Beauregard, & his army, they too must have some excuse for conduct, hence the cry of 'surprise' than which nothing could be more absurd —You may have seen it stated that Gen Grant did not arive on the battle field till 10, 11, 12, & some say 2 o'clock when the truth is he started from savanna within ten minuets after he heared the first boom of the cannon & after stoping at Crumps landing to order Lew Walace he arrived at Pittsburg at 8, & at 20 minuets past was in his saddle, & at the head of his army. He found six Regts of his men panic stricken, & wholly demoralized, & more constantly breaking through the lines like frightened deer. By a masterly stroke of Generalship he stoped the panick in ten minuets, & there was not an other escaped during the day—His next move was to arest some 12 or 15 white feathered officers who were trying to demoraliz the rest of the army to hide their own cowardice Then by the assistance of the gallant Sherman he reorganized his army, & by dint of strategy, good generalship able help, undanted bravery & hard fighting, he held the field for ten long bloody & doubtful hours,

against an army nearly three to his one, & they flushed with victory, & engaged in the last desperate struggle for victory—That night he lay on the ground with his soldiers, & as soon as day dawned he was lifted on his horse (for he had recd a hurt on friday night while reconnoitering which so crippled him he could not help himself) and moved up on the enemy strongly reinforced & after 20 hours more hard fighting, with but little apparant gain on either side, he headed a last desperate charge which send Beauregard & his hosts crawling to their strong hold at Corinth. And this is the Gen your subaltern would have shot while he would justify the five thousan scadadlers—Shame on such a Demagogue I must close" ALS, Warren A. Reeder, Hammond, Ind. Grant expressed similar ideas about his son in a letter of July 12 to Washburne. ALS, DLC-Elihu B. Washburne.


To Mrs. Charles F. Smith

Pittsburg Landing Tenn
April 26th 1862

MRS C F SMITH
No 191 EAST 4TH ST NEW YORK

It becomes my painful duty to announce to you the death of your lamented husband Major General Charles F Smith. He died at 4 Oclock P M yesterday at Savanna Tennessee

In his death the nation has lost one of its most gallant and most able defenders

It was my fortune to have gone through West Point with the Gen. (then Captain as & Commandant of Cadets) and to have

-83-

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