The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant: April 1 - August 31, 1862 - Vol. 5

By John Y. Simon; Ulysses S. Grant | Go to book overview
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Copies, DLC-USG, V, 12, 13, 14, 95; DNA, RG 393, USG General Orders; ibid., RG 94, 21st Ill., Order Book; (printed) ibid., Special Orders, District of West Tenn. O. R., I, xvii, part 2, 102. On July 16, 1862, Capt. Nathaniel H. McLean issued Special Field Orders No. 161. "The District of West Tennessee, Major-General Grant commanding, will include the Districts of Cairo and Mississippi; that part of the State of Mississippi occupied by our troops, and that part of Alabama which may be occupied by the troops of his particular command, including the forces heretofore known as the Army of the Mississippi." Ibid., p. 101.


To Maj. Gen. John A. McClernand

[July 17, 1862]
By Telegraph from Corinth.

Hold Grand Junction with your present force until otherwise directed I will make Grand Junction a cavalry out post with light transportation enabling them to move back rapidly to Bolivar should it prove a necessary contingency, which I do not expect.

Copy, Register of Letters, McClernand Papers, IHi. On July 13, 1862, Maj. Gen. John A. McClernand telegraphed to USG. "The enemy are reported, by one of Col. Leggetts scouts, who has been in their camp, to be in some force with cavalry, Infantry and Artillery at and in the vicinity of Salem, under instructions, cut off supply Trains, destroy the Rail road and attack Grand Junction, now protected by the forces under Col. Leggett. Genl. Thayer refuses to forward from Memphis the mail to the troops at Grand Junction. will you please order it forward" Copies, ibid. On July 12, McClernand had written details of the same operation to Col. John C. Kelton. LS, DNA, RG 393, District of West Tenn., Letters Received. On July 16, Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman telegraphed to USG. "Gen. Hurlbut's & my Divisions are ready to move, but Col. Leggett declines to move his command from the Junction without McClernand's orders— my orders to Hurlbut are to see Col. Leggett with all his stores at the Junction fairly off for Bolivar, before evacuating Lagrange & marching west. I shall give him another day to move: he got my written orders sent by express yesterday & if he dont move I will then put in motion my column by first, bringing Hurlbut up to Moscow & then marching west taking up our detachments by the way." Telegram received, ibid., Dept. of the Mo., Telegrams Received; copies, ibid., RG 94, Generals' Papers and Books, William T. Sherman, Telegrams Sent; DLC-William T. Sherman.

On the same day, McClernand telegraphed to USG. "Your telegram enables me to act intelligently. It is hard to evacuate Grand Junction to the Enemy— leaves loyal men & their property a prey to rebel bandits. Give me another

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