The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant: April 1 - August 31, 1862 - Vol. 5

By John Y. Simon; Ulysses S. Grant | Go to book overview

in about 10 days. If you have time I should like to have a word from you. —When the weather shall get a little cooler, I intend to visit you." ALS, USG 3.

1.
Henry S. Fitch, son of Col. Graham N. Fitch, was born in N. Y., and eventually moved to Chicago, where he practiced law and was appointed U. S. attorney for the northern district of Ill. in 1858. In 1860, a question arose about his accounts, but an audit failed to reveal any wrongdoing on his part. A political associate of both President Abraham Lincoln and U. S. Senator Orville H. Brown- ing, Fitch, a War Democrat, offered his resignation to Lincoln and applied for a commission as asst. adjt. gen. in 1861. Lincoln nominated him as asst. q. m. and capt. in July, 1861, and he was serving in Memphis when USG arrived. Fitch to Lincoln, Jan. 7, 1859, Jan. 30, 1861, DLC-Robert T. Lincoln; Fitch to Browning, June 26, 1861, DNA, RG 94, Letters Received; Fitch to Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton, Dec. 27, 1862, ibid. ; Fitch to Brig. Gen. Lorenzo Thomas, Sept. 10, 1861, ibid.; HED, 36-1-53.

To Maj. Gen. Henry W. Halleck

Head Quarters, Dist. of West Ten.
Corinth, July 23d 1862

MAJ. GEN. H. W. HALLECK
COMD. G DEPT. OF THE MISS.
WASHINGTON CITY.
GEN.

Since you left here the greatest vigilance has been kept up by our Cavalry to the front but nothing absolutely certain of the movements of the enemy have been learned. 1 It is certain however that a movement has taken place from Tupello. In what direction or for what purpose is not so certain. Deserters and escaped prisoners concur in this statement but all concuring so nearly I doubt whether they have not been misled with the view of having the information reach us. It would seem from these statements that a large force moved on the 7th of this month towards Chatanooga. That Price was at Tupello on the 17th and made a speech to his command promising to take them back to Mo. through Ky. That his ordnance and provision train had moved Westward with seventeen days rations and he has likely followed ere this. 2

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