The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant: April 1 - August 31, 1862 - Vol. 5

By John Y. Simon; Ulysses S. Grant | Go to book overview

Copies, DNA, RG 110, Recommendations for Appointments, Ill., 13th District; ibid., RG 56, Collector of Customs Applications, Tex., Corpus Christi. On Oct. 9, 1862, President Abraham Lincoln endorsed this letter. "Submitted to the Secretary of War—If the appointment can be lawfully made as suggested by Genl. Grant let it be done" Copies, ibid. No appointment resulted. For William C. Carroll, newspaper correspondent, staff officer of Brig. Gen. John A. Logan, and, possibly, vol. aide to USG during the battle of Shiloh, see "William C. Carroll in the Civil War," USGA Newsletter, X, 2 (Jan., 1973), 7-16.

1.
Maj. Gen. John E. Wool of N. Y., then commanding the 8th Army Corps, Middle Dept.

To Jesse Root Grant

Corinth, Mississippi
August 3d 1862

DEAR FATHER,

Your letter of the 25th of July is just received. I do not remember of receiving the letters however of which you speak. One come from Mary speaking of the secessionest Holt who was said to be employed in the Memphis post. office. I at once wrote to Gen Sherman who is in command there about it and he is no doubt turned out before this.

You must not expect me to write in my own defence nor to permit it from any one about me. I know that the feeling of the troops under my command is favorable to me and so long as I continue to do my duty faithfully it will remain so. 1 Your uneasiness about the influences surrounding the children here is unnecessary. On the contrary it is good. They are not running around camp among all sorts of people, but we are keeping house, on the property of a truly loyal secessionist who has been furnished free lodging and board at Alton, Illinois; 2 here the children see nothing but the greatest propriety.

They will not, however, remain here long. Julia will probably pay her father a short visit and then go to Galena or Covington in time to have the children commence school in September.

-263-

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