The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant: April 1 - August 31, 1862 - Vol. 5

By John Y. Simon; Ulysses S. Grant | Go to book overview

As Gen. Halleck has not been relieved from the Command of the Department, and is absent from it, there may be some delay. I will forward your letter to insure the acceptance of Col. Quinns resignation when a successor to Gen. Halleck is named.

very respectfully, your obt svt.
U. S. GRANT
Maj. Gen.

ALS, Burton Historical Collection, MiD. Born in N. Y. in 1818, educated at Hamilton and Union colleges, Austin Blair was admitted to the N. Y. bar in 1841. He moved to Mich., was active in the Whig Party, and proposed Negro suffrage while serving as a state legislator. In 1854, he participated in the organization of the Republican Party, and was elected governor in 1860.

1.
Col. Francis Quinn, 12th Mich., fought at Shiloh under Brig. Gen. Benjamin M. Prentiss. Quinn was accused of cowardice at Shiloh by many in his regt., but formal court-martial charges, signed by seventeen officers of the 12th Mich., were not filed until after Quinn's resignation. Joseph Ruff, "Civil War Experiences of a German Immigrant as Told by the Late Joseph Ruff of Albion," Michigan History Magazine, XXVII (Spring, Summer, 1943), 271-301, 442-48; Detroit Free Press, April 29, 1862; information supplied by John Gillette, Berrien Springs, Mich., Aug., 1971. On Aug. 27, 1862, Maj. Gen. John A. McClernand telegraphed to USG that Quinn had withdrawn his resignation. Copies, McCler- nand Papers, IHi. On Aug. 31, however, Capt. Simon M. Preston issued Special Orders No. 311, Dept. of the Miss., accepting the resignation. Copy, DNA, RG 94, Dept. of the Miss., Special Orders.

To Maj. Gen. Henry W. Halleck

Head Quarters, Dist. of West Ten.
Corinth, August 9th 1862

MAJ. GEN. H. W. HALLECK,
GEN. IN CHIEF OF THE ARMY
WASHINGTON D. C.
GEN.

I address you direct no order yet being received announcing your staff and not feeling certain that you should be addressed through the Adjutant General of the Army.

-277-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant: April 1 - August 31, 1862 - Vol. 5
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 458

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.