The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant: April 1 - August 31, 1862 - Vol. 5

By John Y. Simon; Ulysses S. Grant | Go to book overview

To Julia Dent Grant

Corinth August 18th 1862

DEAR JULIA,

I suppose you are this evening quietly at your fathers enjoying a social talk! I wish I could be there or any place els where I could be quiet and free from annoyance for a few weeks.

From present indications you only left here in time. Lively opperations are now threatened and you need not be surprised to hear at any time of fighting going on in Grants Army. I hope we will be let alone however for a short time.

We all miss you and the children very much. Without Jess to stauk through the office it seems as if something is missing— Col. Dickey 1 has not yet returned nor Hillyer 2 nor Ihrie 3 arrived. Riggin being absent and Rawlins confined to his bed makes our family small. Rowley 4 absent too. Rawlins was obliged to have a serious surgical opperation performed to prevent his biles, or carbuncle, from turning into Fistula. He will probably be ten days laid up.

No letters have come to you or none from home since you left.

As I cannot write of Military operations my letters to you, although they will be frequent, will not be long nor very interesting. —Since you left there has been several little skirmishes within my District resulting in the killing and capturing of quite a number of Guerrillas with but a small loss on our side. 5

How did you find your pa Aunt Fanny 6 and the rest of the folks at home ? Give my love to all of them.

Try and collect your money from Mr. White. 7 If that is not paid I will have to close on him which I do not wish to do during the continuance of the War. —Do any of the neighbors call to see you ?

Good night dear Julia. Kiss the children for me and kisses for yourself. I will write again in a few days so that you will probably receive another letter by the same mail that takes this. You ought to write to Nelly 8 to come down now as you may have no

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