The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant: April 1 - August 31, 1862 - Vol. 5

By John Y. Simon; Ulysses S. Grant | Go to book overview

To Maj. Gen. Henry W. Halleck

Grants Head Quarters [Aug. ] 31 [1862]

GENL HALLECK.
GENL.

The following dispatch is received from Bolivar, Tenn. Col Hogg 1 in command of twentieth. Twenty ninth Ohio infantry & some cavalry were attacked by about four thousand Rebels yesterday our troops behaved well driving the enemy whose loss was over one hundred. Ours twenty five men killed & wounded Col Hogg being one of the number

U. S. GRANT.

Telegram received, DNA, RG 94, Generals' Papers and Books, Telegrams Received by Gen. Halleck; copies, ibid., RG 393, USG Hd. Qrs. Correspondence; DLC-USG, V, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 88.

To create a diversion which would make it possible to link his forces with those of Maj. Gen. Earl Van Dorn for a major attack on USG's left, Maj. Gen. Sterling Price sent Act. Brig. Gen. Frank C. Armstrong north from Guntown, Miss., on Aug. 22, 1862. On Aug. 26, Armstrong reached the Coldwater River, where he was reinforced by troops under the command of Col. William H. Jackson. Armstrong then had a total of about 3,500 troops. On Aug. 29, they crossed the Memphis and Charleston Railroad at La Grange, Tenn., and spent the night within nine miles of Bolivar, Tenn. On Aug. 30, Armstrong's superior force contacted units under the command of Col. Mortimer D. Leggett. Leggett called for reinforcements, with whose help his troops were able to retreat behind the fortifications at Bolivar. Leggett stated that he had fewer than 900 men, and that his losses were 5 killed, 18 wounded, and 64 missing. O. R., I, xvii, part 1, 46-49; Harbert L. Rice Alexander, "The Armstrong Raid Including the Battles of Bolivar, Medon Station and Britton Lane," Tennessee Historical Quarterly, XXI, 1 (March, 1962), 31-37; Albert Castel, General Sterling Price and the Civil War in the West (Baton Rouge, 1968), pp. 94-96. For reports of the engagement, see O. R., I, xvii, part 1, 43-51.

On Aug. 27, Brig. Gen. William S. Rosecrans telegraphed to USG. "Your dispatch red. can that be Prices movement you remember his cannon went west of Tupelo" Telegram received, DNA, RG 393, Dept. of the Mo., Telegrams Received. On Aug. 27, Rosecrans telegraphed to USG. "Granger telegraphs : 'My impression is that Genl Armstrong is march in on Humboldt Tenn. or some point in that vacinity. He left Gun Town with seven to nine regiments with ten days rations and a small wagon train on last Friday He is marching on a road some distance West of here, and that attack yesterday was intended to cover his movements. The Companies belonging to Arkansas, Tenn. and Miss regts after arriving at Ripley marched West to a point between Salem and Holly Springs, then turned about, joined Falkner, and came here. Lookout for the R. R.'

-338-

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