The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant: December 9, 1862 - March 31, 1863 - Vol. 7

By John Y. Simon; Ulysses S. Grant | Go to book overview
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Grant authorized him to rescind the order of detail of 800 men of Genl Smiths Division for work on the canal, upon the ground that the details from the 13th Army Corps were very heavy and that Genl Sherman could furnish the men for that work from his Corps nearby The detail was therefore withheld by his order. I am further directed by Genl McClernand to inquire if it is desired that the detail should be renewed." DfS, ibid.; copy, DNA, RG 393, 13th Army Corps, Letters Sent.

On Feb. 11, Rawlins issued Special Field Orders No. 1. "The work on the Canal across the point opposite Vicksburg will be pushed forward with all possible dispatch under the general supervision of Capt. Prime Chief Engineer. Details will be furnished on the requisition of Captain Prime by Army Corps Commanders as follows: The 15th Army Corps will furnish all details for the work south of the Rail Road. The 13th Army Corps will furnish the details for all work north of the Railroad levee to the main levee, and the contrabands will work from that point north to the river. During the progress of this work all other details will be reduced to the least possible minimum. Capt. Prime will construct a channel at least sixty feet in width and with as much depth as the high stage of the water will admit." DS, McClernand Papers, IHi.


To Maj. Gen. Henry W. Halleck

Vicksburg Miss
Feb 3rd 1863 1 P M

MAJ GENL H W HALLECK
GENL IN CHIEF

One of the Rams ran the blockade this morning 1 This is of vast importance cutting off the Enemys communication with the west bank of the River One Steamboat laying at Vicksburg was run into but not sunk Work on the canal is progressing as rapidly as possible

U S GRANT
Maj Genl Comdg

Telegram received, DLC-Robert T. Lincoln; DNA, RG 107, Telegrams Collected (Bound); copies, ibid., Telegrams Received in Cipher; ibid., RG 393, Dept. of the Tenn., Hd. Qrs. Correspondence; DLC-USG, V, 5, 8, 24, 88. O.R., I, xxiv, part 1, 14.

1.
Since the ram Queen of the West, Col. Charles R. Ellet, ran the blockade on the morning of Feb. 2, 1863, USG may have misdated his telegram or erred in his first sentence.

-280-

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The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant: December 9, 1862 - March 31, 1863 - Vol. 7
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