The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant: December 9, 1862 - March 31, 1863 - Vol. 7

By John Y. Simon; Ulysses S. Grant | Go to book overview

but I have little doubt Van Dorn, with all his cavalry and a division of infantry, will move on this railroad. If he comes, I hope to make him sick of the experiment. Quinby seems averse to going down the river, and wished me to speak to you about it. He must tell you his own reasons. I found, much to my surprise, yesterday, an order from your headquarters directing Captain [Asher R. ] Eddy to sell all the cotton in Government possession, and it was advertised to be sold to-day. Believing you have not understood the matter fully, I ordered a postponement of sale until you could investigate and decide. It will not do to sell the cotton and pay to the owners 25 cents per pound, the price to be paid by speculators. If the Government has any claim on the cotton, it owns its full value. If the owners can establish their claims, it will not be for a fraction of the value, but for it all. Either the cotton is liable to confiscation and belongs entirely to the Government, or it must all be given to the owners. I mean all the value of the cotton. Some of the claims have been established beyond cavil, and it was to avoid any trouble to you that I have had the sale postponed. If the Government will make a rule to buy all the cotton, taking it out of traders' hands entirely, then it will be fairly entitled to what profit can be made between purchase and sale; but the seizure of the cotton gives the Government no right to a profit or to take the profits by force out of the legitimate traders' hands. Hoping you will soon be here to examine these matters in person, ... P. S. —Have just received a note from Hurlbut, saying he leaves Cairo for Memphis to-night." Ibid., pp. 30-31. See letters to Maj. Gen. Stephen A. Hurlbut, Feb. 9, 13, 1863.

On Feb. 6, USG again wrote to Hamilton. "If the 1st Infantry has not yet left Corinth leave them there until further orders." Copies, DLC-USG, V, 18, 30; DNA, RG 393, Dept. of the Tenn., Letters Sent.


To Brig. Gen. James C. Veatch

Before Vicksburg Feb 6. 1863.

BRIG GENL J C VEATCH
COMMDG DIST OF MEMPHIS.

When Generals Sherman and McArthurs' Divisions left Memphis, a great number of men were left behind in Hospitals, many of whom must now be convalescent.

I wish you would cause an inspection of the Hospital, and see that proper facilities are given to secure the sending of all men in Hospital back to their Regiments as fast as they are able to do duty

There should be certain days in each week when the Surgeon in charge of Hospitals should make an inspection and order men

-293-

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