The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant: December 9, 1862 - March 31, 1863 - Vol. 7

By John Y. Simon; Ulysses S. Grant | Go to book overview

To Maj. Gen. Stephen A. Hurlbut

Head Quarters, Dept. of the Ten.
Lake Providence La. Feb. 13th 1863.

MAJ. GEN. S. A. HURLBUT
COMD. G 16TH ARMY CORPS,
GEN.

The steamers Rose Hamilton and Evansville are reported for violating my orders regulating trade. 1 Not being at Hd Quarters I have not got access to orders to give you No and date of the order refered to but it was published about the 20th of January and prohibits boats landing at other than Military posts or under the protection of Gunboats. 2

Trade is not opened below Helena and therefore vessels landing atal below there, except for Government, without special authority are liable to seizure.

I wish you would refer this matter to the Provost Marshal for investigation.

I have seen your Gen. Order No 4 Feb. 8th prohibiting the circulation of the Chicago Times within your command. There is no doubt but that paper with several others published in the North should have been suppressed long since by authority from Washington. As this has not been done I doubt the propriety of suppressing its circulation in any one command. The paper would still find its way into the hands of the enemy, through other channels, and do all the mischief it is now doing.

This course is also calculated to give the paper a notoriety evidently saught and which probably would increase the sale of it. I would direct therefore that Gen. Order No 4 be revoked. 3

Information which I have just received, and which is undoubted, shows that VanDorn with his force went over to the Mobile road, to Okolona. 4 Price is at Grenada with six or seven thousand men, only. North of that point there is no large force on the Miss. C. R. R. Our Cavalry can go to the Tallahatchie

-316-

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