The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant: December 9, 1862 - March 31, 1863 - Vol. 7

By John Y. Simon; Ulysses S. Grant | Go to book overview

To Maj. Gen. Stephen A. Hurlbut

Head Quarters, Dept. of the Ten.
Before Vicksburg, Feb.y 22d 1863.

MAJ. GEN. HURLBUT,
COMD. G 16TH ARMY CORPS
GEN.

So soon as all the rolling stock of the rail-road is got away from Columbus the road North from Jackson may be abandoned, disposing of the troops guarding it as your judgement may dictate.

I directed Gen. Hamilton to have all workshops, Depots of stores, and every thing not required by the troops, removed from all posts between Grand Junction and Corinth, via Jackson, removed to points intended to be perminantly occupied, so that in case of necessity this part of the road may be abandoned and the troops removed to wherever their services may be required. I do not want Jackson abandoned however except in case of absolutely necessity.

If Col. Lee is perfectly satisfied that some of his men are being punished as described in his report, by rebel authority, he may serve in the same manner an equal number of the enemy and open a correspondence with Gen. Tilghman as he proposes. 1

I will want one Division of troops brought forward and held in readiness to be join this expedition when called for.

I sent orders some time ago for the 2d Ill. Cavalry to be forwarded here without delay. As they have not come I presume my order never reached you. They may now be held for further orders.

If the six 8 in. howitzers at Memphis have not yet been sent here they need not be sent but forward them to Corinth, with all the ammunition belonging to them. The 1st Inf.y will come here as per orders. 2

Gen. McClernand's Army Corps is deficient in Artillery. 3 I have not the returns before me to designate any particular bat

-348-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant: December 9, 1862 - March 31, 1863 - Vol. 7
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 588

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.