The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant: December 9, 1862 - March 31, 1863 - Vol. 7

By John Y. Simon; Ulysses S. Grant | Go to book overview

place or section is situated, and the Naval Officer Commanding the Mississippi Squadron concurring, shall so declare it in writing to the Secretary of the Treasury. 2nd No goods, wares, or merchandise (except Sutler's supplies, and other supplies for the exclusive use of the Army and Navy) shall be permitted by any Military, Naval or Civil officer, to go to any place or section in the states above named, until after such place or section shall be in manner aforesaid declared as possessed and controlled by the forces of the United States. 3rd No cotton or other production of the States aforesaid shall be permitted by any Military, Naval, or Civil Officer to go from any place or section in the States above named, until after such place or section shall be declared in manner aforesaid as possessed and controlled by the forces of the United States. 4th After declaration as aforesaid, all commercial intercourse with any place or section so declared as possessed and controlled by the forces of the United States, shall be conducted exclusively under the regulations of the Secretary of the Treasury, and no Military or Naval Officer shall permit or prohibit any trade with or transportation to or from any such place or section except when requested to aid in preventing 'violations of the conditions of any clearance or permit granted under said regulations, and in cases of unlawful traffic' or 'unless absolutely necessary to the successful exucution of Military or Naval plans or movements' in such place or section. 5th No place or section in the States aforesaid south of Helena, shall be regarded as possessed and controlled by the forces of the United States, until after declaration made as aforesaid. Places and Sections in said states north of Helena and within the Military lines of the United States Army shall be so regarded, and trade there with shall be conducted under regulations of the Secretary of the Treasury. 6th All Military and Naval Orders heretofore issued, and conflicting herewith, shall be revoked. I hereby approve the within rules and recommend their adoption so far as regards the Department of the Tennessee Dated near Vicksburg February 24 1863" Copies, ibid., RG 45, Area 5 ; Miss. Dept. of Archives and History, Jackson, Miss. O. R. (Navy), I, xxiv, 435-36.

1.
See letter to Edwin M. Stanton, Dec. 6, 1862.

To Act. Rear Admiral David D. Porter

Feb.y 24th 1863.

ADMIRAL,

I will have a lookout at all times on the opposite side of the point. I have no rockets however to signal with but if you can furnish them I will have them sent to the Pickets with instructions to send one up as a signal that the Ram is passing up and two close together should she start up and turn back again. One Rocket will indicate a movement up stream and two down.

-354-

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