The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant: December 9, 1862 - March 31, 1863 - Vol. 7

By John Y. Simon; Ulysses S. Grant | Go to book overview
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a communication from Col. Wilson to Gen. Ross—I have made the copies in haste, to detain the Gun Boat as brief a time as possible— ... P. S.-I shall follow the suggestions of Gen. Ross, and cut the levee and let the water in. It will do us no harm, and can do the enemy no good—" ALS, DNA, RG 94, War Records Office, Dept. of the Tenn. O.R., I, xxiv, part 1, 392-93. The enclosures are printed ibid., p. 396.

On March 21, Prentiss wrote to USG. "I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt this morning of your communication of the 17th concerning the new aspect of affairs on the Yazoo. Deeming it important for the furtherance of your designs as therein explained, that Gen. Smith should not be longer delayed at this end of Yazoo Pass, I have issued orders to him to join Gen. Quinby as soon as possible after securing a sufficient number of suitable transports. I enclose a copy of the order. I have issued no detailed orders or instructions, not considering it my duty to interfere with either your plans or Gen. Quinby's, but merely to extend all the aid in my power, whenever and wherever possible, without such interference." LS, DNA, RG 393, Dept. of the Tenn., Letters Received. O.R., I, xxiv, part 3, 123-24.

1.
On March 22, Maj. Gen. Stephen A. Hurlbut, Memphis, wrote to USG. "Four days since Genl Prentiss sent his Q. Master & Chief of Artillery here to obtain Boats—Heavy guns and heavy ammunition for the troops at Greenwood in the Yazoo. I considered his statement so pressing that I sent him from the Fort four twenty four pound si[e]ge guns & filled the requisition for ammunition. I also sent down the Boats (list enclosed). Brig Genl. A. P. Hovey had passed up the River to St Louis & Cincinnati to look up transportation under orders from Genl Prentiss—I should have stopped but he assured me the orders were by your direction. Capt Lyman A. Q. M—has orders to seize & send forward every available boat. No exertions will be spared here to push this matter forward I have telegraphed your message to Col. Parsons." ALS, DNA, RG 393, Dept. of the Tenn., Letters Received. O.R., I, xxiv, part 3, 129.
2.
See letter to Maj. Gen. James B. McPherson, March 5, 1863.

To Maj. Gen. John A. McClernand

Head Quarters, Dept of the Ten
Head of Millikins Bend La.
March 18th 1863.

MAJ. GEN. J. A. MCCLERNAND,
COMD. G 13TH ARMY CORPS.
GEN.

It was my intention to have stoped at the Bend to-day to have explained fully to you the nature of the present movements. But being delayed so late compells me to pass on to Youngs Point.

-440-

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