The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant: January 1 - May 31, 1864 - Vol. 10

By John Y. Simon; Ulysses S. Grant | Go to book overview

Telegram, copies, DLC-USG, V, 34, 35; DNA, RG 393, Military Div. of the Miss., Letters Sent. On Jan. 14, 1864, USG telegraphed to Governor John Brough of Ohio. "order the thirteenth (13) cavalry to this place I will direct the quartermaster at Louisville to furnish transportation" Telegram received, AGO Records, Ohio Archives, Columbus, Ohio; copies, DLC-USG, V, 34, 35; DNA, RG 393, Military Div. of the Miss., Letters Sent. On the same day, Brough telegraphed to USG. "The ninth regt. of O. Cavalry is ready for the field Gen'l Fry telegraphs it awaits your orders as to destination we want the camp very much to equip the twelfth Cavalry have you made any order in the matter or can you do so" Copy, ibid., Telegrams Received.

On Jan. 15, USG telegraphed to Brig. Gen. Robert Allen. "There are abundant rations here for one hundred days You can use therefore transportation for forage to the exclusion of rations, until the rivers are navigable." Copies, DLC‐ USG, V, 34, 35; DNA, RG 393, Military Div. of the Miss., Letters Sent. O. R., I, xxxii, part 2, 103.


To Maj. Gen. Henry W. Halleck

Head Quarters Mil. Div. of the Miss.
Nashville Ten. Jan.y 15th 1864

MAJ. GEN. H. W. HALLECK,
GEN. IN CHIEF, WASHINGTON D. C.
GENERAL,

I reached here the evening of the 12th on my return from East Tennessee. I felt a particular anxiety to have Longstreet driven from East Tennessee, and went there with the intention of taking such steps as would secure this end. I found however a large part of Foster's command suffering for want of clothing, especially shoes, so that in any advance not to exceed two thirds of his men could be taken. The difficulties of supplying them are such that to send reinforcements,

at present, would be to put the whole on insufficient rations for their support. Under these circumstances I only made such changes of position of troops as would place Foster nearer the enemy when he did get in a condition to move, and would open to us new foraging grounds and diminish those held by the enemy. Having done this and seen the move across the Holston, at Strawberry Plains, commenced, I started on my return via Cumberland Gap, Barboursville, London 1 & Richmond 2 to Lexington Ky. The weather was intensly

-14-

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