The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant: January 1 - May 31, 1864 - Vol. 10

By John Y. Simon; Ulysses S. Grant | Go to book overview

ambitions after this was accomplished. He is now a Major General in the regular army, and will doubtless be placed at the head of it. And I believe that is the extent of his ambition." Jesse R. Grant, In the Days of My Father General Grant (New York and London, 1925), pp. 53-55. Other portions of this letter were incorporated verbatim in Morris's biography of USG, published anonymously in the Washington, D. C., National Intelligencer, March 21, 1864. On March 22, Morris wrote to USG. "I send you herewith a dozen papers containging my sketch of your life, character and services. You can have more if you desire them. My object in preparing the memoir was not to make it too long or too short, so that it would do you justice and could be read at one sitting without wearying. I have sent copies of the paper to your Father, Mother Lady, at St Louis, friends in Ohio &c. There are some typographical errors in the publication, and doubtless may be some in the details, but I hope you may find it in the main correct. I was as careful as my limited means of acquiring the facts, and time would allow. Gentlemen who have read the sketch seem highly delighted with it. If it needs any correcting please let me know I wrote it because I had never met with any thing in print which I thought did you justice" ALS, USG 3. See letters to Jesse Root Grant, Feb. 20, March 1, 1864.


To Maj. Gen. Henry W. Halleck

Chattanooga Tenn

7 P M Jany 22/64

MAJ GEN HALLECK
GEN IN CHIEF

There is no objection to removing trade restrictions in all Kentucky East of the Tennessee River I would advise no change in Tennessee until Longstreet is driven out. If Sherman Expedition proves successful I would then see no objection to the removal of restrictions [in] the whole state and in West Kentucky

U S GRANT
Maj Genl

Telegram received, DNA, RG 107, Telegrams Collected (Bound); copies, ibid., Telegrams Received in Cipher; (misdated Jan. 20, 1864) ibid., RG 393, Military Div. of the Miss., Hd. Qrs. Correspondence; DLC-USG, V, 40, 94. O. R., III, iv, 42. On Jan. 21, Maj. Gen. Henry W. Halleck telegraphed to USG. "The Secty of the Treasury proposes to remove restrictions on trade in Kentucky & part of Tennessee. I presume there is no objection in regard to Kentucky. Please report if in what part, if any, of Tennessee these restrictions can be removed with safety." ALS (telegram sent), DNA, RG 107, Telegrams Collected (Bound). O. R., III, iv, 41. On the same day, 1:00 A. M., Maj. Gen. George H. Thomas, Chattanooga, telegraphed to USG. "Until the people of Tennessee by their voluntary act

-54-

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