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The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant: January 1 - May 31, 1864 - Vol. 10

By John Y. Simon; Ulysses S. Grant | Go to book overview

On the preceding evening, USG dined at the Planters' House, where a large crowd assembled for a serenade. USG responded: "Gentlemen: I thank you for this honor. I cannot make a speech. It is something I have never done, and never intend to do, and I beg you will excuse me." After continued calls for more, USG spoke again. "Gentlemen: Making speeches is not my business. I never did it in my life, and never will. I thank you, however, for your attendance here." Ibid., Jan. 29, 1864.


To Maj. Gen. Henry W. Halleck

(Cypher)

St. Louis Jan. 28th/64

MAJ. GEN. HALLECK WASHINGTON

Before leaving Chattanooga I directed one Div. to move between the Chicamauga & the Hewassee to cover the river and to be on the road if it should prove necessary to reinforce Foster. Thomas was to make a demonstration towards Dalton at the same time. These moves may induce the enemy to reinforce Johnston as his Army is rapidly dissolving by desertions. I also made arrangements for pushing through to Knoxville as many rations as possible to support reinforcements if they should have to go. A Cavalry raid in the direction named in your dispatch is almost impossible with the present state of the roads. Fearing it might be attempted however I directed Gen. Ammen before I left Ten. to watch closely and to collect the Ky. forces to meet it if attempted.

U. S. GRANT
Maj. Gen.

ALS (telegram sent), DNA, RG 94, War Records Office, Miscellaneous War Records; telegram received, ibid., RG 107, Telegrams Collected (Bound). O. R., I, xxxii, part 2, 244-45. See following telegram.


To Maj. Gen. George H. Thomas

(Cypher)

St. Louis, Jan. 28th/64

MAJ. GEN. THOMAS, CHATTANOOGA TEN.

Gen. Hallect telegraphs that one Brigade left Ewells Corps on the 17th one the 20th to reinforce Longstreet or Johnston. If the

-71-

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