The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant: January 1 - May 31, 1864 - Vol. 10

By John Y. Simon; Ulysses S. Grant | Go to book overview

for the last three years, and unite them again in one common cause—that of their country and peace.

I am, gentlemen, with great respect, your obedient servant,

U. S. GRANT, Maj. Gen. U. S. A.

Missouri Democrat, Feb. 2, 1864. William G. Eliot, born in New Bedford, Mass., in 1811, graduated from Harvard Divinity School, and organized a Unitarian church in St. Louis, where he was a founder of Washington University. George Partridge, president of the Union Merchants' Exchange, had established a grocery business in Boston before moving to St. Louis about 1840, where he continued to deal in groceries and contributed $150,000 to Washington University. See O. R., III, ii, 947.


To Julia Dent Grant

Louisville Feb'y 3d 1864

DEAR JULIA,

Owing to a break in the New Albany & Chicago rail-road I did not reach here until last night. This morning I called on Mr. Page's family. 1 Charles is quite unwell, confined to his bed. Disease more Hypocondria I think than anything els. I go to Nashville in the morning. Have no more peace here than in St. Louis. At Hd Qrs. I am constantly busy and as I get no rest away I do not know what I am to do. I believe I will move temporarily to some one company post out on the rail-road where no body lives and where but few people are to be seen.

If you will send to the Photograph establishment on the N. E. corner of 4th & Walnut you can get some of me that are probably better than any heretofore taken. If they are send me some of them.

Louisville on account of the Crittenden Court of Enquiry 2 is filled with Maj. Gens. I want to get away. —You will have no difficulty in going to Nashville by way of the river. Col. Myers, Quartermaster, came over here with me. On his return he will call on you and let you know that when you want to start he will pick out a good boat for you and see you safe aboard. —Jess' pony is all right. I will have it sent to wherever he is next summer. —Orvil, the goose, has bought Collins out and is of course tied to Galena.

-76-

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