The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant: January 1 - May 31, 1864 - Vol. 10

By John Y. Simon; Ulysses S. Grant | Go to book overview

of a Nation rest far more on you than upon any other man. In common with all who desire the welfare of the Nation I trust and pray that the Future will add to your distinguished reputation, so that at the end of our troubles, the history of the world will show few who have performed so enviable or so distinguished a part. You would be spared this letter of congratulation however, did I not wish to express to you warmly my appreciation of the profound wisdom you have shown in avoiding making speeches and all political entanglements. —It is my earnest sense of how much depends upon you that induces me to express a wish that you may continue the wise and patriotic course you have adopted. Twenty seven years in the Naval service and a not inconsiderable intercourse with persons in political life at Washington, among them 'Jeff Davis' whom I knew very well, has impressed me that there are higher aspirations than political preferment ; that the gratitude and love of a whole people and the record of a great and unselfish career are of far greater worth. I pray you then for the sake of our unhappy country, to continue steadfastly in the wise course you have adopted, and doubt not that with the blessings of Providence you will realize the hopes of a Nation and bring us again into a state of prosperity. I saw Capt De Camp of the Navy three weeks ago who spoke most kindly of you and of Mrs. Grant whom he knew in times past at St. Louis. —His brother I think was a particular friend and died in New York when you were present, of Cholera. I am now suffering with rheumatism and on leave, but trust soon to be able to go on blue water again. I trust that when peace and quiet is restored I shall have the pleasure of meeting you. Your relatives the Tweeds and indeed all the members of Mrs. Van Dykes family I see frequently; they are charming, particularly Miss Alice who is admired by all who know her. Believe me most truly your admirer and early friend" ALS, USG 3. On April 18, USG wrote: "Pass Comd.r. D. Ammen, U. S. N. to and from the Army of the Potomac free over Military rail-roads. Good until countermanded." ANS, Winterthur Manuscripts, Eleutherian Mills Historical Library, Greenville, Del. See Daniel Ammen, The Old Navy and the New (Philadelphia, 1891), pp. 383-85.

1.
On July 10, 1863, Alice Tweed, Cincinnati, wrote to USG. "I take this opportunity to send to you by my Uncle, 'Augustus C Van Dyke' the very sincere congratulations of myself and mother for the unparalelled success you have met with, in taking the stronghold of the Confederacy. believe me we watch with the utmost interest your every act—and none more heartily rejoice in your success than our family—With highest considerations of regard, and prayers for your continued prosperity" ALS, USG 3.

To Maj. Gen. John M. Schofield

By Telegraph from Nashville [Feb. ] 17 12.30 P M 186[4]

To MAJ GENL SCHOFIELD

Can you not by proper disposition of your Cavalry and Grangers Corps prevent any raid on your Communications west of Knoxville? It is highly desirable Thomas should make a move for which

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